Course Descriptions


Click here
for the Departmental policy on retaking courses with a lab component.


CHEMISTRY COURSE DESCRIPTIONS

CHEM 101 The Chemistry of Life (Gen. Ed. Domain II-B)
An exploration of the origin of life on a molecular basis; a familiarization with the basic chemistry of living organisms and their environment; an understanding of the laws that govern life; and a discussion on the fate of life as a consequence of drugs and man's chemical pollution of the earth's atmosphere, soil and water. Designed as a terminal non-laboratory course for the liberal arts non-science student.

CHEM 103 Introductory Chemistry (Gen. Ed. Domain II-B, Lab)
A one-semester introductory chemistry course focusing on the fundamental core concepts of inorganic chemistry. Topics include scientific measurements, atomic-molecular theory, properties of the elements, chemical bonding, intermolecular attractions, energy and matter, liquids, solids, and gases, solutions, basic types of chemical reactions, chemical equilibrium, acids and bases, and nuclear chemistry. These core concepts are explored and expanded upon during weekly laboratory sessions. Laboratory (3 hours). Note: This course does not satisfy either the Chemistry major requirement or the Chemistry minor requirement. Students wishing to pursue advanced study in biology, chemistry, engineering, food science, or the nutrition and dietetics concentration for the food and nutrition major should take CHEM 107 Principles of Chemistry and CHEM 108 Principles of Chemistry and Quantitative Analysis.
Corequisite: A 100-level course in mathematics or eligibility to enroll in MATH 200 Precalculus.

CHEM 107 Principles of Chemistry (Gen. Ed. Domain II-B, Lab)
A study of the fundamental principles of chemistry designed to meet the needs of science majors as well as those pursuing a pre-health curriculum or those seeking a rigorous introduction to chemistry. Topics covered include unit conversions and dimensional analysis, history and structure of the atom, stoichiometry, chemical reactions, solutions, periodicity, and molecular geometry and bonding theories. The laboratory teaches techniques of chemical experimentation including chemical hygiene, the scientific method and keeping a laboratory notebook. Laboratory (3 hours).
Corequisite: MATH 123 College Algebra or eligibility to enroll in MATH 200 Precalculus.

CHEM 108 Principles of Chemistry and Quantitative Analysis (Gen. Ed. Domain II-B, Lab)
A continuation of Principles of Chemistry, designed to meet the needs of science majors as well as those pursuing a pre-health curriculum. Topics include gas laws, equilibrium, kinetics, thermodynamics, and acid/base chemistry. Laboratory focuses on techniques of quantitative analysis: preparations of solutions, wet chemical analysis using volumetric glassware, chemical measurements using pH electrodes and spectrophotometers, data analysis, and laboratory report writing. Laboratory (4 hours).
Prerequisites: Completion of CHEM 107 Principles of Chemistry with a minimum grade of C- (1.70) and either completion of MATH 123 College Algebra with a minimum grade of C- (1.70) or eligibility to enroll in MATH 200 Precalculus.

CHEM 131 Science - Environment and Health (Gen. Ed. Domain II-B, Lab)
An integrative laboratory science course to prepare non-science majors to make informed decisions relating to the environment, health, and technology. Central principles of physical, environmental, and biological chemistry are discussed, with application of these principles to current events. Assignments and laboratory sessions apply theoretical principles to everyday life. Laboratory (3 hours).
Prerequisite: MATH 123 College Algebra is recommended background.

CHEM 201 Introductory Organic Chemistry and Biochemistry
A one-semester introductory chemistry course intended to provide the fundamental core concepts of organic chemistry and biochemistry. Core concepts include identification of organic functional groups and their most common reactions, and identification of biological compounds such as carbohydrates, lipids, proteins, enzymes, and nucleic acids as well as their properties and metabolic pathways. These core concepts are explored and expanded upon during weekly laboratory sessions. Laboratory (3 hours).
Prerequisite: CHEM 103 Introductory Chemistry.

CHEM 207 Organic Chemistry I
An in-depth course which covers structure, properties, preparation, and reactions of the principal classes of organic compounds. The chemistry of aliphatic hydrocarbons, alkenes, alkynes, and alkyl halides is introduced. Substitution, elimination, and addition reactions are covered in detail, with an emphasis on reaction mechanisms. Laboratory introduces the standard techniques (distillation and reflux, crystallization and melting points, extraction, column and gas chromatography, IR spectroscopy and Mass Spectrometry) used for the synthesis, purification and identification of organic compounds and illustrates some typical reactions of alkanes, alkenes and alcohols. Laboratory (4 hours).
Prerequisite: Completion of CHEM 108 Principles of Chemistry and Quantitative Analysis with a minimum grade of C- (1.70).

CHEM 208 Organic Chemistry II
A continuation of CHEM 207 Organic Chemistry I. Aromatic compounds, alcohols, aldehydes, ketones, amines, carboxylic acids and their derivatives are studied. Aromatic substitution, acyl transfer, and carbonyl condensation reactions are covered, with emphasis on understanding reaction mechanisms and synthetic applications. Laboratory work reinforces synthetic techniques, (preparation, purification, and identification) including 1H and 13C NMR spectroscopy. Laboratory (4 hours).
Prerequisite: CHEM 207 Organic Chemistry I.

CHEM 301 Biochemistry I
A study of the physico-chemical aspects of biological activity; the chemistry of carbohydrates, lipids, nucleic acids, amino acids and proteins, kinetics and enzymes; bioenergetics; coenzymes; and intermediary metabolism of carbohydrates, fats, and nitrogen-containing materials such as amino acids, proteins and related compounds, and photosynthesis. The underlying theme of this course is not merely a cataloging of the structure and metabolism of biological compounds, but rather is an understanding of the cell molecular logic of living organisms. Laboratory (4 hours).
Prerequisites: BIOL 101 Biological Concepts or BIOL 161 Introduction to Cell and Molecular Biology and completion of CHEM 207 Organic Chemistry I with a minimum grade of C- (1.70). Completion of CHEM 208 Organic Chemistry II is strongly recommended.

CHEM 303 Physical Chemistry I
An introduction to the principles of physical chemistry. Topics covered include chemical thermodynamics, solutions, chemical equilibrium, electrochemistry, transport properties, and phenomenological chemical kinetics. Laboratory (4 hours).
Prerequisites: CHEM 108 Principles of Chemistry and Quantitative Analysis, PHYS 212 Principles of Physics II, and MATH 220 Calculus II; or permission of the instructor.

CHEM 304 Physical Chemistry II
A continuation of CHEM 303 Physical Chemistry I. Topics covered include an introduction to quantum chemistry, atomic and molecular structure, spectroscopy, kinetic molecular theory, and theoretical chemical kinetics. Laboratory (4 hours).
Prerequisite: CHEM 303 Physical Chemistry I or permission of the instructor.

CHEM 321 Instrumental Analysis
An introduction to the theory and application of common chemical instrumentation with associated laboratory. Topics include spectroscopic methods (atomic and molecular absorption and emission, nuclear magnetic resonance, and mass spectrometry), electrochemical methods (potentiometry and voltammetry), and chromatographic methods (GC, HPLC). Laboratory (4 hours).
Prerequisites: CHEM 208 Organic Chemistry II and PHYS 212 Principles of Physics II.

CHEM 332 Biochemistry II
A continuation of CHEM 301 Biochemistry I, which covers basic nucleotide chemistry. Informational biomolecules, nucleotide metabolism, cell signaling and regulatory mechanisms, molecular physiology, protein structure and catalysis, regulation of biochemical processes, and integrated metabolic systems are studied in-depth. Laboratory emphasizes structural analysis of DNA and proteins, isolation and identification of DNA and proteins, and control of gene expression. Laboratory (4 hours).
Prerequisites: CHEM 208 Organic Chemistry II and CHEM 301 Biochemistry I

CHEM 390 Special Topics in Chemistry
An in-depth examination of topics in chemistry at a level beyond that of introductory courses. Topics vary depending on the interests of the instructor, and may be interdisciplinary. Active student participation is required. This course may be taken twice, provided a different special topic is being offered.
Prerequisite: CHEM 208 Organic Chemistry II or permission of the instructor. Additional prerequisites may be required dependent upon topic.

CHEM 401 Inorganic Chemistry
An introduction to the theories of structure and bonding used in inorganic chemistry and a study of the descriptive chemistry of the elements and their representative compounds. Topics covered include atomic structure and trends in the periodic table, structure and bonding in crystalline lattices, valence bond and molecular orbital theories of covalent bonding, descriptive chemistry of the non-transition elements, properties of transition metals, and structure and bonding in transition metal complexes interpreted in terms of the valence bond, crystal field and molecular orbital theories. Laboratory (4 hours).
Prerequisite: CHEM 208 Organic Chemistry II.

CHEM 480 Chemical Research I
Designed to develop a working appreciation of methods of scientific inquiry through development of an original research project. Topics include the selection of a research problem, examination of the chemical literature, study of advanced safety issues, interpretation of data, and the reporting of results. Students initiate a research project with a faculty member and make significant progress on the project.
Prerequisites: CHEM 208 Organic Chemistry II, a minimum cumulative QPA of 1.70 in all Chemistry courses, and permission of instructor.

CHEM 481 Chemical Research II
A continuation of CHEM 480 Chemical Research I in which the students complete their research project under the supervision of a faculty member. The two-semester research experience is completed with a formal written report and seminar presentation.
Prerequisite: Completion of CHEM 480 Chemical Research I with a minimum grade of C- (1.70).

CHEM 490 Directed Study in Chemistry
An in-depth study of a selected advanced chemistry topic or topics under the direction of a chemistry faculty member. The grade is based on a written report of the study and/or oral exam.

CHEM 495 Internship in Chemistry
A supervised work experience in an area of the student’s interest that complements formal course work. The internship program is offered through cooperation of participating institutions that provide guidance for the interns. A minimum of 160 on-site hours is necessary to complete the internship in Chemistry and must be verified by the on-site supervisor and a member of the Chemistry faculty. The 160 hours must be completed within one (1) semester. The internship in Chemistry may be taken for one (1) course credit in the major as a free elective. A student may not enroll in an internship more than twice (two course credits). Any student interested in participating in an internship must consult with the department chair prior to the semester of the desired internship. A written plan for the internship must be submitted by the student to the department chair. The plan must be approved by the department chair as well as the faculty member who serves as internship coordinator. The student must meet with the faculty internship coordinator at least four (4) times during the semester. The grade for the internship is assigned by the internship coordinator with input from the on-site supervisor. Data gathered during the internship may not be utilized for CHEM 480 Chemical Research I or CHEM 498 Chemical Research II.
Prerequisites: Chemistry majors of Junior or Senior standing, two (2) semesters completed at Framingham State University, overall QPA of 2.50 with a 2.70 average in courses for the major, and approval of the department chair.


FOOD SCIENCE COURSE DESCRIPTIONS

FDSC 151 Principles of Food Science (Gen. Ed. Domain II-B)

A study of food systems as chemical entities. This course employs biological sciences, physical sciences, and engineering in the study of the nature of foods, causes of deterioration, and the principles underlying food processing. Emphasis is placed on food research in the twenty-first century. Note: Students cannot receive credit for both FDSC 151 Principles of Food Science and FDSC 161 Introduction to Food Science and Technology

FDSC 161 Introduction to Food Science and Technology (Gen. Ed. Domain II-B, Lab)
An introduction to food science and technology based on an understanding of the chemical principles regulating the properties of food. This course employs physical sciences, biological sciences, and engineering in the study of the nature of food, food safety, and the technology underlying the processing and preservation of food. Laboratory sessions coordinated with the lectures illustrate and reinforce the important relationships between chemical principles and food.
Note: Students cannot receive credit for both FDSC 161 Introduction to Food Science and Technology and FDSC 151 Principles of Food Science.

FDSC 351 Food Engineering and Processing
An integrated approach of food engineering principles and food processing techniques. Topics include thermodynamics, fluid flow and heat transfer, evaporation, refrigeration, psychrometry, drying, distillation, and the essential food processing methods that ensure attainment of food product wholesomeness. Laboratory.
Prerequisite: Permission of instructor.

FDSC 405 Food Analysis
A study of the fundamental principles of food analysis with the laboratory work including both the classical and the more recent sophisticated methods of analysis.
Prerequisite: CHEM 301 Biochemistry I.

FDSC 408 Food Chemistry
A study of the chemistry of food constituents and the chemical and biological changes occurring in foods during storage and processing. The approach is from a cellular and molecular level.
Prerequisite: CHEM 301 Biochemistry I.

FDSC 413 Food Safety and Microbiology
A focus on the microorganisms involved in food production, food spoilage, and the transmission of diseases through foods. The effect of various methods of food preservation is evaluated in terms of public health, food spoilage, food quality and nutritional value of foods. Laboratory (4 hours). Open to Food Science Majors or Minors only or with permission of instructor.
Prerequisite: BIOL 307 Microbiology.

FDSC 490 Directed Study in Food Science
An original problem to be selected and researched under the direction of a faculty member. A written presentation of the research findings is required.
Prerequisite: Permission of the instructor.

FDSC 495 Food Industrial Practicum
Enhancement of student's practical knowledge of food science by participating in projects sponsored by industrial and/or governmental agencies.
Prerequisite: Permission of the instructor.

100 State Street

PO Box 9101

Framingham, MA 01701-9101

|

Phone: 508-620-1220


Mobile Version

Copyright © 2014 Framingham State University