Complete Course List and Descriptions

ENGL 100 Introduction to College Writing
A course that prepares students for ENGL 110 Expository Writing. Course work emphasizes critical reading and thinking, the writing process, the structure and development of paragraphs and essays, and the conventions of college-level academic writing. Note: Credit is given for this course only if taken before ENGL 110 Expository Writing

ENGL 110 Expository Writing (Gen. Ed. Goal 1)
Designed to improve the writing of expository prose needed in college and beyond. The emphasis rests on collecting, evaluating, and organizing evidence from primary and secondary sources in order to support an explicit, arguable, and substantive thesis. The course includes the writing of a well-researched and documented paper that draws on traditional and electronic sources. Note: Credit will not be given for this course and ENGL 102 Essentials of Writing. Students must pass ENGL 110 to fulfill the College’s writing requirement (General Education Goal 1) and entering students must complete this course within their first three semesters. Credit is given for both this course and ENGL 100 Introduction to College Writing if ENGL 100 Introduction to College Writing is taken first.
Prerequisite: Satisfactory performance on the English writing and reading placement exams or ENGL 100 Introduction to College Writing.

ENGL 111 Approaches to Literature (Gen. Ed. Goal 4)
An introduction to critical reading and discussion of poetry, prose, and drama for the purpose of increasing the student’s appreciation of the dynamics between themes and forms in the art of literature. Some sections emphasize literary forms and others philosophical, moral, or social themes.
Note: Students who have taken 21.111 Types of Literature or 21.115 Ideas in Western Literature will not receive credit for this course. This course is not open to English majors or Interdisciplinary Language Arts majors.

ENGL 201 Mythology and Folklore (Gen. Ed. Goals 4, 12)
A comparative analysis of myths and folklore from various cultures, such as Native American, Greek, American, Teutonic, and African American. A significant part of the exploration deals with issues of class and race, as well as gender problems like female-male stereotyping. Other topics may include postulation of common types of tales and motifs, theories of the origin and nature of myth and folklore, as well as consideration of each myth or folklore piece as representative not only of its genre but also a possibly intact unified structure.
Prerequisite: Completion of Gen. Ed. Goal 1 or permission of instructor.

ENGL 202 Comparative Mythology (Gen. Ed. Goals 4, 11)
A comparative study of primarily ancient myths through the Western and non-Western world, emphasizing such sources as Indian, Mayan, Finnish, Native American, Near Eastern, and Greek. Each belief system is first studied by itself before resemblances to other systems are sought. Finding elements that recur in a myth and that appear in other myths leads to considering the origin and nature of myth, as well as the significance of myth for a group of people.
Prerequisite: Completion of Gen. Ed. Goal 1 or permission of instructor.

ENGL 203 Global Perspectives in Literature (Gen. Ed. Goals 4, 11)
An introduction to contemporary literature outside of Europe and the United States. The course also includes Western writings which highlight international encounters between cultures. Readings are in English and draw on various genres.
Prerequisite: Completion of Gen. Ed. Goal 1 or permission of instructor.

ENGL 204 Literary Study
The foundation course for the major in English. This seminar focuses on close reading, analytical writing, and research methods. Students examine in depth one important work in English (or a group of related works) and the criticism surrounding it. English majors are encouraged to take Literary Study as early as possible. Literary Study is a prerequisite for all 300-level English courses used to fulfill 300-level requirements.
Prerequisite: ENGL 110 Expository Writing; for students not in the English major/minor or the Interdisciplinary Major in Language Arts, permission of the instructor is required.

ENGL 206 Film and Literature
An examination of the relationship between film and literature with a close analysis of the aesthetic and practical problems involved in adapting fiction to the film. Readings include film and literary criticism, as well as the fiction upon which films viewed in class are based. Discussions focus on the potentialities, limitations and nature of each art form.
Prerequisite: Completion of Gen.Ed. Goal 1 or permission of the instructor.

ENGL 207 The Language of Film (Gen. Ed. Goal 5)
A study of the vocabulary proper to an intelligent discussion of film. Topics to be included are directorial techniques, the role of editing, styles of film acting, the relation of one shot to another, mise-en-scene and montage, lighting, and the relationship between form and content. Emphasis is on an aesthetic of the film from the perspective of the film-viewing experience.
Prerequisite: Completion of Gen. Ed. Goal 1 or permission of the instructor.

ENGL 208 Film Genres
Studies of genre films concentrating on the historical, thematic, and specifically cinematic nature of representative sound and silent works. Possible genres include comedy, the western, the gangster film, the musical, the horror film and science fiction, and the “woman’s picture.” A different genre is selected each time the course is offered.
Prerequisite: Completion of Gen. Ed. Goal 1 or permission of the instructor.

ENGL 209 Film History: 1895 to 1960 (Gen. Ed. Goal 5)
An overview of the major developments in film history from 1895 to 1960. Starting with early filmic experimentation and covering the rise and fall of the classical Hollywood studio system, the course includes significant directors, genres (such as gangster film and film noir), and international movements. Wars, revolutions, immigration, the Great Depression, and the Cold War are studied for their influence on the new medium of film. Note: Students may not receive credit for both ENGL 209 Film History: 1895 to 1960 and ENGL 205 Film History and Criticism.
Prerequisite: Completion of Gen. Ed. Goal 1 or permission of the instructor.

ENGL 212 Children’s Literature
A study of literature for children from pre-school through grade 6. The course examines classic and contemporary board books, picture books, chapter books, and pre-adolescent texts. Through an exploration of seminal authors, works, genres, and criticism, the course emphasizes trends and developments in children’s literature. An introduction to basic bibliographic tools and review media is included.
Prerequisite: Completion of Gen. Ed. Goal 1 or permission of instructor.

ENGL 217 The History of Children’s Literature
A survey of children’s literature from the eighteenth century to the present. Topics may include early chapbooks, picture books, and the development of the novel for children. Students examine changing representations of the child and the role literature has played in defining childhood.
Prerequisite: Completion of Gen. Ed. Goal 1 or permission of the instructor.

ENGL 219 Young Adult Literature
A study of literature for young adults from grades 6 through 12. The course examines classic and contemporary works from a variety of fictional genres, including realism, fantasy and science fiction, as well as poetry. An introduction to basic bibliographic tools and review media is included.
Note: Students may not receive credit for both 21.395 Literature for Young Adults and 21.219 Young Adult Literature
Prerequisite: Completion of Gen. Ed. Goal 1 or permission of instructor.

ENGL 220 Shakespeare (Gen. Ed. Goals 4, 12)
An introduction to Shakespearean comedy, tragedy, history, and romance in such plays as As You Like It, Measure for Measure, King Lear, Othello, Henry V, and The Tempest. The course explores the Elizabethan-Jacobean roots of Shakespeare’s plays and their continuing popularity by studying language, dramatic technique, performance on stage and screen, and the representation of gender, race, and class. Students who have received credit for 21.215/315 Shakespeare I, or 21.216/316 Shakespeare II will not receive credit for this course.
Prerequisite: Completion of Gen. Ed. Goal 1 or permission of instructor.

ENGL 225 Introduction to Journalism
An introduction to the profession of journalism providing historical background, basis for libel, and other fundamental, technical and legal knowledge for journalists. Students produce extensive writing in a variety of journalistic formats, such as news, features, and op/ed pieces. The course also investigates current issues in contemporary journalism by analyzing a wide range of newspapers.
Prerequisite: Completion of Gen. Ed. Goal 1 or permission of instructor.

ENGL 229 Film History: 1960 To Present (Gen. Ed. Goal 5)
A study of film history from 1960 to the present. The course includes the New Hollywood, independent cinema, the emergence of postcolonial filmmaking in Africa, South America, the Indian subcontinent, and Asia; and technological innovations such as CGI. Major directors and their groundbreaking films are studied, as is the visual style of postmodernism. Note: Students may not receive credit for both ENGL 229 Film History: 1960 to Present and ENGL 205 Film History and Criticism.
Prerequisite: Completion of Gen. Ed. Goal 1 or permission of the instructor.

ENGL 232 Irish Literature (Gen. Ed. Goal 4)
A consideration of the development of Irish literature from its origins in myth, saga, and lyric through the twentieth century, with emphasis on the period from the Literary Revival in the late nineteenth century to the present. Among the writers covered are Swift, William Carleton, Maria Edgeworth, Thomas Moore, Yeats, Synge, O’Casey, Joyce and Beckett.
Prerequisite: Completion of Gen. Ed. Goal 1 or permission of instructor.

ENGL 234 Global Cinema

An exploration of films from around the world within their unique cultural contexts. The course examines global films' styles and themes, analyzing their relationship to the social and political conditions that produced them. Topics vary each time the course is offered, focusing on an individual country, a region, a theme, a director, or a historical period.

Prerequisite: Completion of Common Core Writing Requirement (ENGL 110 Expository Writing) or permission of the instructor.

ENGL 243 The American Short Story (Gen. Ed. Goals 4, 12)

A survey of the short story in America from Irving, Poe, and Hawthorne to the present with emphasis on writers who reflect various regions, cultures, and ethnic groups.
Prerequisite: Completion of Gen. Ed. Goal 1 or permission of instructor.

ENGL 250 Literature and Gender (Gen. Ed. Goal 4)

An exploration of the relations between gender and literature as they pertain to authorship, literary representations of men and women, constructions of masculinity and femininity, and literary criticism. Topics vary and may include the literature of a particular period or country, a specific genre, and gay and lesbian literature.
Prerequisite: Completion of Gen. Ed. Goal 1 or permission of instructor.

ENGL 251 British Literature I: Old English to 1680
A chronological study of British literature that focuses on representative works and authors through 1680. Readings include Beowulf, selections from Chaucer’s The Canterbury Tales, one Shakespeare play, and selections from other writers such as Malory, Spenser, Sidney, Donne, Cary, and Milton. Works are explored in the context of the literary, cultural, and historical milieu in which they were produced.
Prerequisite: Completion of Gen. Ed. Goal 1 or permission of instructor.

ENGL 255 British Literature II: 1680-1890
A chronological study of British literature from the Restoration to the Late Victorian period that focuses on representative works and authors. Readings include selections from such writers as Behn, Swift, Johnson, Wordsworth, Coleridge, Austen, Byron, the Brontes, Shelley, Keats, Tennyson, Arnold, Browning, and George Eliot. Works are explored in the literary, cultural, and historical milieu in which they were produced.
Note: ENGL 251 British Literature I is not a prerequisite to this course.
Prerequisite: Completion of Gen. Ed. Goal 1 or permission of instructor.

ENGL 260 American Ethnic Literature (Gen. Ed. Goals 4, 12)
A study of Native American, African American, Asian American, Hispanic American, and other ethnic writers. The course explores issues of individual and collective identity, as well as the tension between assimilation and ethnic affirmation in the works of writers throughout American history. Note: Students who have taken 21.260 Minority Literature will not receive credit for this course.
Prerequisite: Completion of Gen. Ed. Goal 1 or permission of instructor.

ENGL 261 American Writers I (Gen. Ed. Goals 4, 12)
A survey of literature from the age of European exploration to the middle of the nineteenth century. The course reflects the diversity and range of American experience. Readings may include letters and journals of early discoverers, explorers, and settlers; selections from the Native American oral tradition; essays by Ralph Waldo Emerson, Margaret Fuller, and Henry David Thoreau; autobiographies by Frederick Douglass and Harriet Jacobs; and
poetry and fiction by writers ranging from Anne Bradstreet to Herman Melville.
Prerequisite: Completion of Gen. Ed. Goal 1 or permission of instructor.

ENGL 262 American Writers II (Gen. Ed. Goals 4, 12)
A survey of literature since the middle of the nineteenth century. The course reflects the diversity and range of American experience. Readings may include memoirs, criticism, poetry, fiction, or drama by authors such as Emily Dickinson, Mark Twain, Willa Cather, T.S.Eliot, William Faulkner, Tennessee Williams, and James Baldwin. Note: ENGL 261 American Writers I is not a prerequisite for this course.
Prerequisite: Completion of Gen. Ed. Goal 1 or permission of instructor.

ENGL 264 African American Literature (Gen. Ed. Goals 4, 12)
A study of the fiction and non-fiction of African Americans throughout American history, including characteristic literary forms such as the slave narrative, autobiography, and song. The course focuses on such writers as Wheatley, Douglass, Jacobs, Washington, DuBois, Hurston, Toomer, Hughes, Baldwin, Wright, Ellison, King, Malcolm X, Walker, Morrison, and Wilson.
Prerequisite: Completion of Gen. Ed. Goal 1 or permission of instructor.

ENGL 265 Western Literature: Origins to the Renaissance
A course designed to acquaint students with the foundations of western literature and with great writers of western civilization from antiquity through the Middle Ages. Representative selections from such writers as Homer, Plato, Virgil, and Dante, as well as such works as the Bible, Greek drama, the medieval epic and romance are studied in translation.
Prerequisite: Completion of Gen. Ed. Goal 1 or permission of instructor.

ENGL 266 Western Literature: Enlightenment to the Present
A study of great continental writers of western civilization from the Renaissance to the present. Representative selections from such writers as Boccaccio, Rabelais, Machiavelli, Voltaire, Rousseau, Goethe, Dostoevsky, Tolstoy, Ibsen, Mann, Camus, and Duras are studied in translation.
Note: ENGL 265 Western Literature: Origins to the Renaissance is not a prerequisite for this course.
Prerequisite: Completion of Gen. Ed. Goal 1 or permission of instructor.

ENGL 271 Development of the Drama (Gen. Ed. Goal 4)
A study of the drama as an art form from its genesis in classical antiquity through its most recent expressions. Representative plays illustrating this development are read and discussed and students are encouraged to prepare selected scenes for class presentation. Related topics touched on include history of the theater and the literature of dramatic criticism.
Prerequisite: Completion of Gen. Ed. Goal 1 or permission of instructor.

ENGL 277 Contemporary World Literature by Women (Gen. Ed. Goals 4, 12)
An examination of the work of an international, cross-cultural selection of late twentieth and early twenty-first century women writers through a variety of critical approaches including feminism and postcolonialism.
Prerequisite: Completion of Gen Ed. Goal 1 or permission of instructor.

ENGL 280 Persuasive Writing
Designed to teach students to write on civic matters for public audiences. Students study examples of public discourse and develop their own projects, which may include op-ed columns, blog writing, and policy proposals. At least one project is sent directly to its intended public audience. Particular attention is paid to ethical rhetorical practices.
Prerequisite: Completion of Gen. Ed. Goal 1 or permission of instructor.


ENGL 282 Creative Writing
A study of the methods and techniques of creative writing, with emphasis on the variety of forms used in contemporary literature. Students are encouraged to experiment both in prose and poetry in order to develop new strategies to express their experiences and feelings. Students read manuscripts in class.
Prerequisite: Completion of Gen. Ed. Goal 1 or permission of instructor.

ENGL 283 Writing Poetry
A workshop in reading and writing poetry, with an emphasis on personal expression, free verse technique, and contemporary adaptations of traditional forms. Some attention is also given to techniques developed by contemporary poets for teaching poetry to children and adolescents.
Prerequisite: Completion of Gen. Ed. Goal 1 or permission of instructor.

ENGL 284 Creative Nonfiction
A study in writing non-fiction prose, including narration, description, and exposition, to help students improve their general ability to communicate experiences, observations, and thoughts.
Prerequisite: Completion of Gen. Ed. Goal 1 or permission of instructor.

ENGL 286 Professional Writing
A career-oriented course introducing students to a wide variety of writing formats used in business, government, and the professions. Assignments may include resumes, employment documents, letters and memos, short proposals, a variety of report formats, public relations and advertising documents, and basic technical writing. This course emphasizes drafting, critiquing, rewriting, and editing, as well as collaborative writing and presentation skills.
Prerequisite: Completion of Gen. Ed. Goal 1 or permission of instructor.

ENGL 288 Writing Fiction
A workshop in reading and writing short fiction with an emphasis on writing from personal experience, use of traditional and contemporary forms, and developing narrative voice, characters, plot, and setting.
Prerequisite: Completion of Gen. Ed. Goal 1 or permission of instructor.

ENGL 297 English Grammar: A Structural Analysis
An intensive analysis of the theory and practice of English grammar. The effects of syntactic structure upon meaning in such phenomena as dependent clauses, prepositional phrases, nouns and verbs, subjects, objects, and modifiers are explored in order to understand a grammatical description of English.
Prerequisite: Completion of Gen. Ed. Goal 1 or permission of instructor.

ENGL 300 Writing for Children
An advanced writing workshop in the methods and techniques of writing for children. Students compose poetry, fiction, and prose for readers in grades Pre-K through 12. Activities include analysis of children’s literature and group critiques of students’ work.
Prerequisite: One course in writing beyond ENGL 110 Expository Writing, or ENGL 212 Children's Literature, or permission of the instructor.

ENGL 313 Medieval and Renaissance Drama

A study of English drama from its festive, religious, and classical roots to the popular entertainments of the pre-modern era. Readings include medieval mysteries and moralities, Renaissance pastoral plays, and Elizabethan-Jacobean tragedies and comedies, with attention to such dramatists as Marlowe, Jonson, Cary, Middleton, Webster, Beaumont, and Fletcher.
Prerequisite: ENGL 204 Literary Study or permission of instructor.

ENGL 314 English Renaissance Literature
The study of sixteenth and seventeenth-century authors who created a new national literature out of classical, continental, and native traditions. Through varying topics and study of such authors as Greene, Spenser, Sidney, Lanyer, Jonson, Wroth, Bacon, Donne, and Milton, students explore literary and cultural contexts for a rich array of genres, including lyric, romance, pastoral, essay, and allegory.
Prerequisite: ENGL 204 Literary Study or permission of instructor.

ENGL 317 Studies in Shakespeare
An exploration of a special topic in Shakespearean drama, focusing on a theme, a genre, or a particular literary, social, or political context in selected plays. Shakespeare is studied as a poet, playwright, and thinker. Topics, which change every year, will include Shakespeare on Film, Shakespearean Families, Gender and Genre in Shakespeare, Shakespeare’s Dramatic Imagery, and Shakespeare’s Tragic Heroes.
Prerequisite: ENGL 204 Literary Study or permission of instructor.

ENGL 318 British Romanticism
A critical and historical study of romanticism in English literature. Concentration is on the major poets: Wordsworth, Coleridge, Byron, Shelley, and Keats.
Prerequisite: ENGL 204 Literary Study or permission of instructor.

ENGL 321 Rise and Establishment of the English Novel
A study of the beginnings, development, and tradition of the novel in England through an examination of contributing prose forms of the sixteenth and seventeenth centuries and the major authors of eighteenth century fiction such as Fielding, Smollett, and Austen.
Prerequisite: ENGL 204 Literary Study or permission of instructor.

ENGL 322 The Nineteenth-Century British Novel
A study of the nineteenth-century British novel, including works form a variety of authors through the century, such as the Brontes, Dickens, George Eliot, Gissing, and Hardy.
Prerequisite: ENGL 204 Literary Study or permission of instructor.

ENGL 325 Studies in Film
An exploration of a special topic in film. Topics, which change each time the course is offered, include the study of an individual director’s body of work, classical or contemporary film theory, or a specific period in film history.
Prerequisite: Completion of Gen. Ed. Goal 1 and one of the following film courses: ENGL 206 Film and Literature, ENGL 207 The Language of Film, ENGL 208 Film Genres, ENGL 209 Film History: 1895 to 1960, ENGL 229 Film History: 1960 to Present; or permission of instructor.

ENGL 330 The Victorian Period
A study of British poetry and prose (exclusive of the novel) from the 1830’s to the end of the nineteenth century with emphasis on forces and influences that have helped to shape the present. Historical and social backgrounds of the literature; major philosophical ideas and conflicts; aesthetic developments; relationships with America and continental Europe.
Prerequisite: ENGL 204 Literary Study or permission of instructor.

ENGL 331 News Writing
A rigorous examination of news writing with emphasis on accuracy, journalistic conventions, and deadlines. Students cover a variety of news events. The course explores the question “What is News?” and such issues as libel, privacy, the right to know, and freedom of information. May be used to fulfill the requirements for the English major.
Prerequisite: ENGL 225 Introduction to Journalism. Students who have taken 21.331 Reporting of Public Affairs will not receive credit for this course.

ENGL 333 Critical Writing
An advanced writing course designed to foster theoretically informed textual analysis. The course includes extensive study of literary theory, research, and writing about a variety of works.
Prerequisite: Completion of Gen. Ed. Goal 1 and two literature courses.

ENGL 335 Feature Writing
A course which emphasizes writing the feature story for newspapers and magazines. This course develops the skills to recognize a news peg that can be expanded into a feature, and studies the growth in the use of features within print journalism.
Prerequisite: ENGL 225 Introduction to Journalism.

ENGL 342 Modern Drama
An examination of methods and types of modern continental, British, and American drama. Critical reading and discussion of plays by such writers as Ibsen, Chekhov, Pirandello, Anouilh, Ionesco, Shaw, Miller, Williams, and Albee.
Prerequisite: ENGL 204 Literary Study or permission of instructor.

ENGL 345 Studies in the Bible as Literature
An in-depth study of the literary art of the Bible in the context of the literature of the ancient Middle East. Focusing on specific topics, the course investigates the special literary characteristics of sacred texts, and may emphasize particular techniques (such as allusion, repetition, or parallelism) or genres (such as poetry, epic, prophecy, fable or history) within the Bible canon.
Prerequisite: ENGL 204 Literary Study or permission of instructor.

ENGL 353 Whitman, Dickinson, and Frost
An in-depth study of the lifetime poetic achievements of Walt Whitman, Emily Dickinson, and Robert Frost, three central figures in American poetry. The course emphasizes close reading, explication, and recitation of poems, as well as research and writing about the poets, their themes and styles, and relevant cultural history.
Prerequisite: ENGL 204 Literary Study or permission of instructor.

ENGL 361 Postcolonial Literature
A study of postcolonial literature by authors with cultural roots in South Asia, Africa, the Caribbean, and other former colonies that achieved independence in the second half of the twentieth century. Readings may include Commonwealth literature from Australia, New Zealand, and Canada; translated texts; and postcolonial criticism.
Prerequisite: ENGL 204 Literary Study or permission of instructor.

ENGL 362 Russian Literature in Translation
A study of novels, short stories, plays, and poetry by Russian writers of the nineteenth and twentieth centuries, including Gogol, Turgenev, Dostoevsky, Tolstoy, Chekhov, Mayakovsky, Olesha, Babel, Pasternak, Solzhenitsyn, and Yevtushenko. The works are studied for the purpose of tracing the continuing concerns of the Russian writers before and after the Revolution. All readings are in English translation.
Prerequisite: ENGL 204 Literary Study or permission of instructor.

ENGL 365 American Romanticism
A critical study of essays, novels, short stories, and poetry by some of the major American writers of the first half of the nineteenth-century. Through a consideration of writers such as Emerson, Thoreau, Hawthorne, and Poe, students explore the aesthetic developments and philosophical ideas expressed through the genre of Romanticism and its related movement, Transcendentalism. The cultural and historical background of the genre is also discussed.
Prerequisite: ENGL 204 Literary Study or permission of instructor.

ENGL 368 American Realism and Naturalism
A critical study of works from the major American writers of the late nineteenth and early twentieth centuries, including such writers as Crane, Dreiser, James, Jewett, Twain, and Wharton. Emphasis is on the development of realism and naturalism, and on the historical, political, and cultural contexts of these literary movements.
Prerequisite: ENGL 204 Literary Study or permission of instructor.

ENGL 370 Studies in American Literature
An exploration of a special topic in American Literature. Topics change each time the course is offered; sample topics include such subjects as American Sea Literature, the Nineteenth-Century Domestic Novel, the American Dream and its Discontents, and Labor and American Literature.
Prerequisite: ENGL 204 Literary Study or permission of instructor.

ENGL 371 Business Writing
Designed to develop students’ abilities to address various business audiences. Projects may include newsletters, brochures, flyers, fact sheets, application articles, press kits, press releases, proposals, documented reports, speeches, and writing for the Web, as well as oral presentations including visual aids. Students study the ethics and problems of writing within business organizations, current computer graphics and electronic drafting, editing, and reviewing techniques. Students who have received credit for 21.471 Business Writing will not receive credit for this course.
Prerequisites: ENGL 286 Professional Writing or permission of instructor.

ENGL 372 Technical Writing
Designed to develop students’ abilities to produce representative technical documents. Projects may include instructions, proposals, technical reports, procedures, tutorials, usability tests, and support websites. Students are introduced to writing for technical and non-technical audiences, as well as to conventions of technical writing and the basics of editing appropriate to technical contexts. Students who have received credit for 21.472 Technical Writing will not receive credit for this course.
Prerequisite: Completion of Gen Ed. Goal 1 or permission of instructor.

ENGL 373 Modern American Fiction
An advanced study of major modern American writers such as Fitzgerald, Hemingway, Cather, West, Faulkner, Hurston, and Wright in the context of the historical and cultural developments of the first half of the twentieth century.
Prerequisite: ENGL 204 Literary Study or permission of instructor.

ENGL 374 Modern British and American Poetry
A study of various modern poets, including Yeats, Eliot, Frost, Robinson, Housman, Hardy, and Hopkins. Attention is given to various theories about the nature and function of modern poetry, particularly where these theories differentiate modern poetry from the poetry of the past.
Prerequisite: ENGL 204 Literary Study or permission of instructor.

ENGL 375 Studies in British Literature
An exploration of a special topic in British literature. Topics change each time the course is offered and may include such subjects as epic poetry, Jacobean drama, the industrial novel, and the representation of the family. Depending on the topic, the course may fulfill the requirement for either Group A or Group B.
Prerequisites: ENGL 204 Literary Study or permission of instructor.

ENGL 376 The Twentieth-Century Novel
A study of major writers, ideas, and forms of the twentieth-century novel in Europe and America, with emphasis on the first half of the century. Close reading and discussion of representative works by such writers as Joyce, Hesse, Faulkner, Camus, and Bellow.
Prerequisite: ENGL 204 Literary Study or permission of instructor.

ENGL 377 Writing for Online and Social Media

Designed to develop students’ abilities to craft a professional online presence and use social media platforms effectively to distribute news stories and other professional writing. Students create blogs, participate in social media, engage in crowd-sourcing, study the best practices in this online area and focus on a single area of interest, such as journalism and politics, education, or business and professional writing.

Prerequisite: One (1) journalism or professional writing course; or permission of instructor.

ENGL 378 Studies in World Literature
An examination of a special topic in world literature. Particular works covered may range from classical to contemporary texts, in English or in translation. Topics change each time the course is offered and may include the classical literature of Greece and Rome, the nineteenth-century European novel, and contemporary African literature. Depending on the topic, the course may fulfill the requirement for either Group D or Group E.
Prerequisite: ENGL 204 Literary Study or permission of instructor.

ENGL 382 Contemporary European Literature
An examination of ideas, trends, and forms in recent literature from Europe, as well as recent works reflecting European consciousness from elsewhere in the world. The course begins with “classic” mid-twentieth century authors such as Beckett and Camus, and moves to writers who came to prominence more recently, such as Berger, Calvino, Coetzee, Duras, Handke, and Kundera. Note: Students will not receive credit for both ENGL 382 Contemporary European Literature and 21.379 Contemporary European and American Literature.
Prerequisites: ENGL 204 Literary Study or permission of instructor.

ENGL 383 Contemporary American Fiction
A study of American fiction since 1945, including writers such as Bellow, DeLillo, Doctorow, Ellison, Morrison, Nabokov, Pynchon, Roth, Tyler, Updike, and Walker. Emphasis is on postmodern narrative experiments and on representations of the self and American experience in the contemporary period. Note: Students will not receive credit for both ENGL 383 Contemporary American Fiction and 21.379 Contemporary European and American Literature.
Prerequisite: ENGL 204 Literary Study or permission of instructor.

ENGL 390 Studies in Genre
An advanced exploration of a single literary genre, such as the novel, non-fiction prose, poetry, or drama. A broad range of literary texts along with contextual documents and works of literary theory are examined.
Prerequisite: ENGL 204 Literary Study or permission of instructor.

ENGL 394 Workshop in Children’s Literature
A workshop which explores the relationship between children’s books and the curriculum of grades K-8. Emphasis is on interdisciplinary and multi-age approaches. Diverse activities provide background for discussion of the literary genres represented in traditional and contemporary writings for children and their application to classroom use.
Prerequisite: ENGL 212 Children’s Literature or permission of the instructor.

ENGL 399 Current Trends in Children’s Literature
A theoretically informed study of current books for children and young adults, with particular emphasis on literary developments, publishing and marketing trends, and recent academic debates. Students will consider the social, technological, and professional contexts in which children’s books are created, evaluated, and marketed. Note: This course does not satisfy the requirement of a 300-level literature course for the English major.
Prerequisite: Completion of one 200-level children’s literature course or permission of instructor.

ENGL 401 The English Language
A study of the ancestry of English, of the processes and results of change in sound, form, and meaning. The classification of languages, social and regional dialects, theories of language acquisition, and other topics are examined to give the student a general understanding of modern developments in linguistics. Note: This course is recommended for students planning graduate study in English.

ENGL 407 Chaucer
A study of The Canterbury Tales, Troilus and Criseyde, and other shorter poems in relation to Chaucer’s world and time, his development as an artist, and the lasting value of the works. After an introduction to Chaucer’s language, students read his works in Middle English.
Prerequisite: ENGL 204 Literary Study or permission of instructor.

ENGL 410 Seminar in Creative Writing
An advanced writing workshop, in which students will be encouraged to follow their own writing interests, particularly in long subjects. Reading and discussion of manuscripts.
Prerequisite: Permission of the instructor.

ENGL 411 Seminar in Prose Writing
An advanced writing workshop for students who already have had some experience in writing nonfiction, and who now wish to complete extended projects or work on new material. The course explores various types of creative nonfiction: biography and memoir, and writing about travel, food, nature, and society. Classes are devoted to discussion of student work and to some discussion of notable nonfiction.
Prerequisite: ENGL 284 Creative Nonfiction or permission of instructor.

ENGL 422 Seminar in Literature
An advanced seminar whose topic -a period, theme, or major author - changes term to term. Students are responsible for original criticism and research in the form of several short papers, oral presentations to the seminar, and a longer paper. Open to junior and senior English majors who have completed at least eight semester courses in English, including ENGL 204 Literary Study and one course at the 300 level; to graduate students concentrating in English; and to others with permission of the instructor and the Chair of the English Department.

ENGL 480 Seminar in Professional Writing
An advanced workshop for students with experience in professional writing. Students undertake an extended project related to business or the professions, conduct research on targeted publications and markets, and submit their finished work for publication. Projects may include manuals, brochures, proposals, and websites.
Prerequisite: One writing course from the Professional Writing concentration or minor or permission of the instructor.

ENGL 481 Editorial Workshop in Journalism
An intensive course in news, feature and editorial writing, as well as copy editing and newspaper management. Students gain hands-on experience working on The Gatepost. This course does not fulfill requirements for the English major.
Prerequisites: ENGL 225 Introduction to Journalism and either ENGL 331 News Writing or ENGL 335 Feature Writing, and a QPA of 3.00 in previous journalism courses; or permission of the instructor.

ENGL 490 Independent Study in English
An independent study supervised by a member of the English Department and offered to juniors and seniors. The independent study may, but need not, be done as an honors project under the jurisdiction of the Honors Committee. It counts as one course in the student’s program and may not substitute for the Seminar in Literature.

ENGL 494 Practicum in Journalism
A supervised field experience in an approved professional setting such as a newspaper office or radio or television station. A written report on the experience is required. This course is open only to students with a QPA of at least 3.00 in their previous journalism courses. Registration is contingent upon the student finding an instructor able to supervise the practicum.
Prerequisite: ENGL 225 Introduction to Journalism, and two of the following: ENGL 331 News Writing, ENGL 335 Feature Writing, ENGL 481 Editorial Workshop in Journalism.

ENGL 495 Practicum in English
A supervised practical experience related to the student’s background and interests, with a written report required as part of the work of the course. Open only to students majoring in English, usually in the senior year, who have a QPA of at least 3.00 in their previous English courses and to students minoring in professional writing who have a QPA of at least 3.00 in the other courses required for that minor. Does not fulfill requirements for English major. Arrangements must be made during the semester before the beginning of the practicum and approved by the Chair of the English Department.

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