English Courses Appropriate for General Education

Courses and Goals
ENGL 110 Expository Writing 1
ENGL 111 Approaches to Literature 4
ENGL 201 Mythology and Folklore 4, 12
ENGL 202 Comparative Mythology 4, 11
ENGL 203 Global Perspectives in Literature 4, 11
ENGL 207 The Language of Film 5
ENGL 209 Film History: 1895 to 1960 5
ENGL 220 Shakespeare 4, 12
ENGL 229 Film History: 1960 to Present 5
ENGL 232 Irish Literature 4
ENGL 243 The American Short Story 4, 12
ENGL 245 The American Novel 4, 12
ENGL 250 Literature and Gender 4
ENGL 260 American Ethnic Literature 4, 12
ENGL 261 American Writers I 4, 12
ENGL 262 American Writers II 4, 12
ENGL 264 African American Literature 4, 12
ENGL 269 Women Writers 4
ENGL 271 Development of the Drama 4
ENGL 277 Contemporary World Literature by Women 4, 12

ENGL 110 Expository Writing (Gen. Ed. Goal 1)
Designed to improve the writing of expository prose needed in college and beyond. The emphasis rests on collecting, evaluating, and organizing evidence from primary and secondary sources in order to support an explicit, arguable, and substantive thesis. The course includes the writing of a well-researched and documented paper that draws on traditional and electronic sources. Note: Credit will not be given for this course and ENGL 102 Essentials of Writing. Students must pass ENGL 110 to fulfill the College’s writing requirement (General Education Goal 1) and entering
students must complete this course within their first three semesters. Credit is given for both this course and ENGL 100 Introduction to College Writing if ENGL 100 Introduction to College Writing is taken first.
Prerequisite: Satisfactory performance on the English writing and reading placement exams or ENGL 100 Introduction to College Writing.

ENGL 111 Approaches to Literature (Gen. Ed. Goal 4)
An introduction to critical reading and discussion of poetry, prose, and drama for the purpose of increasing the student’s appreciation of the dynamics between themes and forms in the art of literature. Some sections emphasize literary forms and others philosophical, moral, or social themes.
Note: Students who have taken 21.111 Types of Literature or 21.115 Ideas in Western Literature will not receive credit for this course. This course is not open to English majors or Interdisciplinary Language Arts majors.

ENGL 201 Mythology and Folklore (Gen. Ed. Goals 4, 12)
A comparative analysis of myths and folklore from various cultures, such as Native American, Greek, American, Teutonic, and African American. A significant part of the exploration deals with issues of class and race, as well as gender problems like female-male stereotyping. Other topics may include postulation of common types of tales and motifs, theories of the origin and nature of myth and folklore, as well as consideration of each myth or folklore piece as representative not only of its genre but also a possibly intact unified structure.
Prerequisite: Completion of Gen. Ed. Goal 1 or permission of instructor.

ENGL 202 Comparative Mythology (Gen. Ed. Goals 4, 11)
A comparative study of primarily ancient myths through the Western and non-Western world, emphasizing such sources as Indian, Mayan, Finnish, Native American, Near Eastern, and Greek. Each belief system is first studied by itself before resemblances to other systems are sought. Finding elements that recur in a myth and that appear in other myths leads to considering the origin and nature of myth, as well as the significance of myth for a group of people.
Prerequisite: Completion of Gen. Ed. Goal 1 or permission of instructor.

ENGL 203 Global Perspectives in Literature (Gen. Ed. Goals 4, 11)
An introduction to contemporary literature outside of Europe and the United States. The course also includes Western writings which highlight international encounters between cultures. Readings are in English and draw on various genres.
Prerequisite: Completion of Gen. Ed. Goal 1 or permission of instructor.

ENGL 205 Film History and Criticism (Gen. Ed. Goal 5)
A study of the development of film and its significance as an art form. Works by notable directors, such as Griffith, Eisenstein, and Welles, are viewed in class and critically analyzed as representative of important film movements, personal artistic expression, and national film cultures. The inherent qualities of film are examined in relationship to the other arts.
Prerequisite: Completion of Gen. Ed. Goal 1 or permission of the instructor.

ENGL 207 The Language of Film (Gen. Ed. Goal 5)
A study of the vocabulary proper to an intelligent discussion of film. Topics to be included are directorial techniques, the role of editing, styles of film acting, the relation of one shot to another, mise-en-scene and montage, lighting, and the relationship between form and content. Emphasis is on an aesthetic of the film from the perspective of the film-viewing experience.

Prerequisite: Completion of Gen. Ed. Goal 1 or permission of the instructor.

ENGL 209 Film History: 1895 to 1960 (Gen. Ed. Goal 5)
An overview of the major developments in film history from 1895 to 1960. Starting with early filmic experimentation and covering the rise and fall of the classical Hollywood studio system, the course includes significant directors, genres (such as gangster film and film noir), and international movements. Wars, revolutions, immigration, the Great Depression, and the Cold War are studied for their influence on the new medium of film. Note: Students may not receive credit for both ENGL 209 Film History: 1895 to 1960 and ENGL 205 Film History and Criticism.
Prerequisite: Completion of Gen. Ed. Goal 1 or permission of the instructor.

ENGL 220 Shakespeare (Gen. Ed. Goals 4, 12)
An introduction to Shakespearean comedy, tragedy, history, and romance in such plays as As You Like It, Measure for Measure, King Lear, Othello, Henry V, and The Tempest. The course explores the Elizabethan-Jacobean roots of Shakespeare’s plays and their continuing popularity by studying language, dramatic technique, performance on stage and screen, and the representation of gender, race, and class. Students who have received credit for 21.215/315 Shakespeare I, or 21.216/316 Shakespeare II will not receive credit for this course.

Prerequisite: Completion of Gen. Ed. Goal 1 or permission of instructor.

ENGL 229 Film History: 1960 To Present (Gen. Ed. Goal 5)
A study of film history from 1960 to the present. The course includes the New Hollywood, independent cinema, the emergence of postcolonial filmmaking in Africa, South America, the Indian subcontinent, and Asia; and technological innovations such as CGI. Major directors and their groundbreaking films are studied, as is the visual style of postmodernism. Note: Students may not receive credit for both ENGL 229 Film History: 1960 to Present and ENGL 205 Film History and Criticism.
Prerequisite: Completion of Gen. Ed. Goal 1 or permission of the instructor.

ENGL 232 Irish Literature (Gen. Ed. Goal 4)
A consideration of the development of Irish literature from its origins in myth, saga, and lyric through the twentieth century, with emphasis on the period from the Literary Revival in the late nineteenth century to the present. Among the writers covered are Swift, William Carleton, Maria Edgeworth, Thomas Moore, Yeats, Synge, O’Casey, Joyce and Beckett.

Prerequisite: Completion of Gen. Ed. Goal 1 or permission of instructor.

ENGL 243 The American Short Story (Gen. Ed. Goals 4, 12)
A survey of the short story in America from Irving, Poe, and Hawthorne to the present with emphasis on writers who reflect various regions, cultures, and ethnic groups.
Prerequisite: Completion of Gen. Ed. Goal 1 or permission of instructor.

ENGL 245 The American Novel (Gen. Ed. Goals 4, 12)
The background and development of the American novel from its beginnings to the present. Covering representative novels by such writers as Hawthorne, Stowe, Melville, Twain, James, Dreiser, Cather, Faulkner, Ellison, Mailer, Bellow, and Morrison, the course reflects the diversity and range of American fiction and addresses the social and intellectual backgrounds of the writers and issues of race, class, and gender.
Prerequisite: Completion of Gen. Ed. Goal 1 or permission of instructor.

ENGL 250 Literature and Gender (Gen. Ed. Goal 4)
An exploration of the relations between gender and literature as they pertain to authorship, literary representations of men and women, constructions of masculinity and femininity, and literary criticism. Topics vary and may include the literature of a particular period or country, a specific genre, and gay and lesbian literature.
Prerequisite: Completion of Gen. Ed. Goal 1 or permission of instructor.

ENGL 260 American Ethnic Literature (Gen. Ed. Goals 4, 12)

A study of Native American, African American, Asian American, Hispanic American, and other ethnic writers. The course explores issues of individual and collective identity, as well as the tension between assimilation and ethnic affirmation in the works of writers throughout American history. Note: Students who have taken 21.260 Minority Literature will not receive credit for this course.
Prerequisite: Completion of Gen. Ed. Goal 1 or permission of instructor.

ENGL 261 American Writers I (Gen. Ed. Goals 4, 12)
A survey of literature from the age of European exploration to the middle of the nineteenth century. The course reflects the diversity and range of American experience. Readings may include letters and journals of early discoverers, explorers, and settlers; selections from the Native American oral tradition; essays by Ralph Waldo Emerson, Margaret Fuller, and Henry David Thoreau; autobiographies by Frederick Douglass and Harriet Jacobs; and
poetry and fiction by writers ranging from Anne Bradstreet to Herman Melville.
Prerequisite: Completion of Gen. Ed. Goal 1 or permission of instructor.

ENGL 262 American Writers II (Gen. Ed. Goals 4, 12) A survey of literature since the middle of the nineteenth century. The course reflects the diversity and range of American experience. Readings may include memoirs, criticism, poetry, fiction, or drama by authors such as Emily Dickinson, Mark Twain, Willa Cather, T.S.Eliot, William Faulkner, Tennessee Williams, and James Baldwin. Note: ENGL 261 American Writers I is not a prerequisite for this course.
Prerequisite: Completion of Gen. Ed. Goal 1 or permission of instructor.

ENGL 264 African American Literature (Gen. Ed. Goals 4, 12)
A study of the fiction and non-fiction of African Americans throughout American history, including characteristic literary forms such as the slave narrative, autobiography, and song. The course focuses on such writers as Wheatley, Douglass, Jacobs, Washington, DuBois, Hurston, Toomer, Hughes, Baldwin, Wright, Ellison, King, Malcolm X, Walker, Morrison, and Wilson.
Prerequisite: Completion of Gen. Ed. Goal 1 or permission of instructor.

ENGL 269 Women Writers (Gen. Ed. Goal 4)

A study of women writers from the medieval to the modern period in the context of their times and literary traditions. Topics vary and include exploration of a specific period; a genre such as life writing, romance, and poetry, or a cultural milieu such as literary circle, place, or family.
Prerequisite: Completion of Gen. Ed. Goal 1 or permission of instructor.

ENGL 271 Development of the Drama (Gen. Ed. Goal 4)
A study of the drama as an art form from its genesis in classical antiquity through its most recent expressions. Representative plays illustrating this development are read and discussed and students are encouraged to prepare selected scenes for class presentation. Related topics touched on include history of the theater and the literature of dramatic criticism.
Prerequisite: Completion of Gen. Ed. Goal 1 or permission of instructor.

ENGL 277 Contemporary World Literature by Women (Gen. Ed. Goals 4, 12)
An examination of the work of an international, cross-cultural selection of late twentieth and early twenty-first century women writers through a variety of critical approaches including feminism and postcolonialism.
Prerequisite: Completion of Gen Ed. Goal 1 or permission of instructor.

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