Restricted Electives

To complete the twelve (12) credits required for the major, students may take additional courses from any of the distribution areas (see Major Requirements). English majors may also take one course in Children's Literature. In addition, majors may take any of the following for credit toward the major:

ENGL 201 Mythology and Folklore
ENGL 206 Film and Literature
ENGL 207 The Language of Film
ENGL 208 Film Genres
ENGL 209 Film History: 1895 to 1960
ENGL 229 Film History: 1960 to Present
ENGL 250 Literature and Gender
ENGL 269 Women Writers
ENGL 297 English Grammar: A Structural Analysis
ENGL 325 Studies in Film
ENGL 375 Studies in British Literature
ENGL 390 Studies in Genre
ENGL 401 The English Language
ENGL 490 Independent Study in English

ENGL 201 Mythology and Folklore (Gen. Ed. Goals 4, 12)
A comparative analysis of myths and folklore from various cultures, such as Native American, Greek, American, Teutonic, and African American. A significant part of the exploration deals with issues of class and race, as well as gender problems like female-male stereotyping. Other topics may include postulation of common types of tales and motifs, theories of the origin and nature of myth and folklore, as well as consideration of each myth or folklore piece as representative not only of its genre but also a possibly intact unified structure.
Prerequisite: Completion of Gen. Ed. Goal 1 or permission of instructor.

ENGL 206 Film and Literature
An examination of the relationship between film and literature with a close analysis of the aesthetic and practical problems involved in adapting fiction to the film. Readings include film and literary criticism, as well as the fiction upon which films viewed in class are based. Discussions focus on the potentialities, limitations and nature of each art form.
Prerequisite: Completion of Gen.Ed. Goal 1 or permission of the instructor.

ENGL 207 The Language of Film (Gen. Ed. Goal 5)
A study of the vocabulary proper to an intelligent discussion of film. Topics to be included are directorial techniques, the role of editing, styles of film acting, the relation of one shot to another, mise-en-scene and montage, lighting, and the relationship between form and content. Emphasis is on an aesthetic of the film from the perspective of the film-viewing experience.
Prerequisite: Completion of Gen. Ed. Goal 1 or permission of the instructor.

ENGL 208 Film Genres
Studies of genre films concentrating on the historical, thematic, and specifically cinematic nature of representative sound and silent works. Possible genres include comedy, the western, the gangster film, the musical, the horror film and science fiction, and the “woman’s picture.” A different genre is selected each time the course is offered.
Prerequisite: Completion of Gen. Ed. Goal 1 or permission of the instructor.

ENGL 209 Film History: 1895 to 1960 (Gen. Ed. Goal 5)
An overview of the major developments in film history from 1895 to 1960. Starting with early filmic experimentation and covering the rise and fall of the classical Hollywood studio system, the course includes significant directors, genres (such as gangster film and film noir), and international movements. Wars, revolutions, immigration, the Great Depression, and the Cold War are studied for their influence on the new medium of film. Note: Students may not receive credit for both ENGL 209 Film History: 1895 to 1960 and ENGL 205 Film History and Criticism.
Prerequisite: Completion of Gen. Ed. Goal 1 or permission of the instructor.

ENGL 229 Film History: 1960 To Present (Gen. Ed. Goal 5)
A study of film history from 1960 to the present. The course includes the New Hollywood, independent cinema, the emergence of postcolonial filmmaking in Africa, South America, the Indian subcontinent, and Asia; and technological innovations such as CGI. Major directors and their groundbreaking films are studied, as is the visual style of postmodernism. Note: Students may not receive credit for both ENGL 229 Film History: 1960 to Present and ENGL 205 Film History and Criticism.
Prerequisite: Completion of Gen. Ed. Goal 1 or permission of the instructor.

ENGL 250 Literature and Gender (Gen. Ed. Goal 4)
An exploration of the relations between gender and literature as they pertain to authorship, literary representations of men and women, constructions of masculinity and femininity, and literary criticism. Topics vary and may include the literature of a particular period or country, a specific genre, and gay and lesbian literature.
Prerequisite: Completion of Gen. Ed. Goal 1 or permission of instructor.

ENGL 269 Women Writers (Gen. Ed. Goal 4)
A study of women writers from the medieval to the modern period in the context of their times and literary traditions. Topics vary and include exploration of a specific period; a genre such as life writing, romance, and poetry, or a cultural milieu such as literary circle, place, or family.
Prerequisite: Completion of Gen. Ed. Goal 1 or permission of instructor.

ENGL 297 English Grammar: A Structural Analysis
An intensive analysis of the theory and practice of English grammar. The effects of syntactic structure upon meaning in such phenomena as dependent clauses, prepositional phrases, nouns and verbs, subjects, objects, and modifiers are explored in order to understand a grammatical description of English.
Prerequisite: Completion of Gen. Ed. Goal 1 or permission of instructor.

ENGL 325 Studies in Film

An exploration of a special topic in film. Topics, which change each time the course is offered, include the study of an individual director’s body or work, classical or contemporary film theory, or a specific period in film history.
Prerequisite: Completion of Gen. Ed. Goal 1 and one of the following film courses: ENGL 205 Film History and Criticism, ENGL 206 Film and Literature, ENGL 207 The Language of Film, ENGL 208 Film Genres; or permission of instructor.

ENGL 375 Studies in British Literature
An exploration of a special topic in British literature. Topics change each time the course is offered and may include such subjects as epic poetry, Jacobean drama, the industrial novel, and the representation of the family.
Prerequisites: ENGL 204 Literary Study or permission of instructor.

ENGL 390 Studies in Genre
An advanced exploration of a single literary genre, such as the novel, non-fiction prose, poetry, or drama. A broad range of literary texts along with contextual documents and works of literary theory are examined.
Prerequisite: ENGL 204 Literary Study or permission of instructor.

ENGL 401 The English Language
A study of the ancestry of English, of the processes and results of change in sound, form, and meaning. The classification of languages, social and regional dialects, theories of language acquisition, and other topics are examined to give the student a general understanding of modern developments in linguistics. Note: This course is recommended for students planning graduate study in English.

ENGL 490 Independent Study in English
An independent study supervised by a member of the English Department and offered to juniors and seniors. The independent study may, but need not, be done as an honors project under the jurisdiction of the Honors Committee. It counts as one course in the student’s program and may not substitute for the Seminar in Literature.

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