Course Descriptions (Page 3)
HIST 317 The Family in American Life
An examination of the composition and roles of families throughout American history, including the material conditions of domestic life and their variations by period, region, class, and ethnicity. Special attention is given to how the idea of the family and the "proper" ordering of its members has contributed to cultural understandings of masculinity and femininity, childhood and adulthood, sexuality, and citizenship.
Prerequisite:  Sophomore standing and a 100-level survey course in United States or European or World history; or permission of instructor.

HIST 318 Religion in America
An interdisciplinary study of the growth of a denominational society in the United States. The course is especially concerned with the impact of American environment on religions imported from Europe and elsewhere, the problems posed by modern science, the development of new American faiths, and the contributions of religion to the core values of American culture.
Prerequisite: Sophomore standing and a 100-level survey course in United States or European or World history; or permission of instructor.

HIST 323 African-American History
An examination of African-American history from the colonial era to the present. Topics
include the rise of chattel slavery, the influence of African-Americans on the American
economy, the evolution of Jim Crow, the rise of the Civil Rights Movement of the
twentieth century, the effects of constitutional and legal changes, and contributions of
African-Americans to American culture.
Prerequisite: Sophomore standing and a 100-level survey course in United States or
European or World history; or permission of instructor.


HIST 326 Women in American History
A study of the changing roles of women from colonial times to the present. Topics include society’s stereotypes of women; women’s social, family, and work roles; and the effect of legislative and constitutional changes on women.
Prerequisite: Sophomore standing and a 100-level survey course in United States or
European or World history; or permission of instructor.

HIST 331 Harding to Roosevelt: The United States 1920 to 1945
An in-depth study of the interwar years and World War II. Topics examined may include cultural changes of the 1920s, labor and social unrest of the era, the Republican ascendancy, the Great Depression, New Deal, class conflict, and World War II at home and abroad.
Prerequisite: Sophomore standing and a 100-level survey course in United States or
European or World history; or permission of instructor.

HIST 337 Caribbean History
An examination of the history of the Caribbean islands from European conquest to the present.   Topics may include conquest, colonization, and cultural exchange; piracy, smuggling, and trade ; slavery and plantation growth; the Haitian Revolution; slave emancipation; industrial development and decolonization; the Cuban Revolution; and the enduring effects of imperialism on the region.
Prerequisite: Sophomore standing and a 100-level survey course in United States or
European or World history; or permission of instructor.


HIST 340 Industrial and Labor History of the United States
A study of the historical development of industry and labor in the U.S. from the middle of the nineteenth century to the present. Special emphasis is placed upon the historical forces that helped to foster industrial growth, the social impact of newly-created corporations, the legal milieu that made expansion possible, the growth of organized labor and class consciousness, and the evolution of a unified, integrated monetary and banking system.
Prerequisite: Sophomore standing and a 100-level survey course in United States or
European or World history; or permission of instructor.

HIST 341 Total, Limited, and Cold: America at War in the 20th Century 
An examination of how wars have shaped the United States’ politics, society, and economic policies during the twentieth century. From the Filipino-American War to the Persian Gulf War, America has been fighting much of the century. The concept of warfare has shifted to fit the country’s changing role in world affairs, from an isolationist nation in the late nineteenth century to a Superpower after World War II.

Prerequisite: Sophomore standing and a 100-level survey course in United States or European or World history; or permission of instructor.

MORE COURSE DESCRIPTIONS

100 State Street

PO Box 9101

Framingham, MA 01701-9101

|

Phone: 508-620-1220


Mobile Version

Copyright © 2014 Framingham State University