Course Descriptions (Page 4)

HIST 347 Portraits in United States History
A biographical examination of the rise and development of significant individuals in the United States. This course considers the relationship between these individuals and events to determine their influence in the development of history. Specific individuals vary by semester.
Prerequisite: Sophomore standing and a 100-level survey course in United States or
European or World history; or permission of instructor.

HIST 349 The 1960’s in Europe and the United States
A comparative study of the era known as “The Sixties” in the United States and Europe. The course focuses on the political, cultural, and social upheaval wrought by the rise of the “New Left” and the successes/failures of the numerous social movements for civil and political rights for marginalized groups. The political and social turmoil of 1968 serves as a focal point for analyzing the period.
Prerequisites: Sophomore standing and a 100-level survey course in United States or
European or World history; or permission of instructor.


HIST 350 Historical Studies Tour
A guided tour, or series of tours, of significant sites, cities, or landmarks in the human past. This course also includes traditional or other methods of teaching. Topics vary according to the specialty of the faculty member. Students are expected to prepare in advance for the excursions and are examined on their learning experiences.
Prerequisite: Sophomore standing and a 100-level survey course in United States or European or World history; or permission of instructor.


HIST 355 Topics in History
A special topic in history to be given at the discretion of the Department. Course topic is determined by the instructor with an emphasis on developing a critical and analytical understanding of the subject under consideration, including relevant historiography. No more than two topics courses may be used to satisfy the departmental requirements for history majors. When topics courses are to be offered, the faculty member presenting the course and its subject will be announced during the prior semester. This course is not part of the Department’s regular curriculum.
Prerequisites: Sophomore standing and a 100-level survey course in United States or European or World history; or permission of instructor.

HIST 356 Holocaust and Genocide in the 20th Century
An examination of the systematic persecution and genocide of ethnic minorities
throughout the 20th century. The primary focus is on the Nazi-led Holocaust of European
Jews, Roma, and other minority groups between 1933 and 1945. Comparisons are made
to other genocides, such as those involving the Armenians, Bosnians, and Rwandans.
Special attention is given to the themes of active and passive resistance and collaboration,
as well as memory and memorialization.
Prerequisite: Sophomore standing and a 100-level survey course in United States or
European or World history; or permission of instructor.

HIST 357 History of medicine and Society in the West - From the Ancient World to Present
A historical examination of health, illness, and disease in the West. The course addresses innovations in medical practice, the ways in which practitioners have both conceived of and treated patients, and patients' experience with heatlh care. The course situates the history of medicine within the context of developments in the realm of science and technology.
Prerequisite: Sophomore standing and a 100-level survey course in United States or European or World history; or permission of instructor.



HIST 362 Ancient Greece: From the Homeric through the Hellenistic Age
An examination of the history of ancient Greece. Topics include the society and thought of the Homeric period; the rise of the polis and the thought of the Archaic age; the Persian wars, the Athenian empire, Periclean Athens, the Peloponnesian wars, and the thought of the fifth century; the empire of Alexander the Great and the thought of the Hellenistic age.
Prerequisite: Sophomore standing and a 100-level survey course in United States or European or World history; or permission of instructor.

HIST 364 Ancient Rome: The Republic and the Empire
An examination of the history of ancient Rome from the founding of the Republic to the collapse of the Empire. Topics include the evolution and decline of the Republic, its concept and institutions of government; the reign of Julius Caesar and the rise of Caesarism; the rise of Augustus and the formation of the Empire; relations of the Empire to the Christian church; the decline of the Empire; and the reigns of the emperors Diocletian, Constantine, and Theodosius. The contributions of Rome in the fields of political, constitutional, and legal thought and institutions are stressed.
Prerequisite: Sophomore standing and a 100-level survey course in United States or European or World history; or permission of instructor.

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