All Courses

MATH 095 General Mathematics (no course credit)
A review of introductory algebra including real numbers, exponents, polynomials, rational expressions, linear equations and inequalities, quadratic equations, graphing, and systems of linear equations. Note: This is a non-credit course.

MATH 110 College Mathematics I (Gen. Ed. Goal 2)
An exploration of numbers, their representations, relationships, and uses; arithmetic; elementary set theory; basic logic; geometry; measurement; probability; and statistics. This course offers a college-level treatment of content areas of interest to prospectiveearly childhood and elementary teachers. Problem-solving and the communication of mathematical ideas, both verbally and algebraically, are woven throughout the course.
Note: Students may not receive credit for both MATH 110 College Mathematics I and MATH 113 Introduction to College Mathematics.
Prerequisite: Satisfactory score on the mathematics placement examination or permission of the Mathematics Department.

MATH 117 Introduction to Statistics (Gen. Ed. Goal 2)
An introduction to the discipline of statistics, emphasizing both statistical thinking and its application to analyzing data. Topics include sampling, design of experiments, organizing and exploring data, probability distributions such as the normal distribution, sampling distributions, hypothesis testing and confidence intervals, correlation and regression. Students are expected to express results of statistical procedures in ordinary non-technical language. Real world applications of statistical topics are emphasized throughout the course.
Prerequisite: Satisfactory score on the mathematics placement examination or permission of the Mathematics Department.

MATH 119 Mathematics for the Liberal Arts (Gen. Ed. Goal 2)
A survey of the beauty and effectiveness of mathematics in describing natural and socialphenomena. Topics may include pattern recognition, logic, sets, number systems, counting  methods, probability, statistics, symmetry, population growth, voting systems, or consumer mathematics. This course is recommended for students whose major does not require MATH 110 College Mathematics I, or MATH 117 Introduction to Statistics, or MATH 123 College Algebra.
Prerequisite: Satisfactory score on the mathematics placement exam.

MATH 120 College Mathematics II
A continuation of MATH 110 College Mathematics I, providing further exploration of numbers and arithmetic, geometry, measurement, probability, and statistics from the point of view of prospective early childhood and elementary school teachers. As in MATH 110, problem solving and the communication of mathematical ideas, both verbally and algebraically, are strands that unite the course.
Prerequisite: MATH 110 College Mathematics I.

MATH 123 College Algebra (Gen. Ed. Goal 2)
Designed to provide the algebraic skills needed in the natural sciences, social sciences, and precalculus. The course emphasizes problem-solving skills, modeling and real-world applications, and explores multiple approaches (numerical, graphical, and symbolic) to algebraic concepts and problems. Topics include the real number system, algebraic expressions, functions and graphs, polynomial and exponential functions, matrices and systems of equations, and complex numbers.
Note: Students may not receive credit for both MATH 123 College Algebra and 43.115 College Algebra and Trigonometry.
Prerequisite: MATH 095 General Mathematics or a satisfactory score on the mathematics placement examination.

MATH 200 Precalculus (Gen. Ed. Goal 2)
A thorough introduction to the basic mathematical functions used in the sciences and the background needed to study calculus. After a brief in-depth review of the required algebra and analytical geometry, topics include functions and graphs, polynomial and rational functions, exponential and logarithmic functions, and trigonometric functions.
Note: Students may not receive credit for MATH 200 Precalculus and 43.133 Precalculus, or for MATH 200 Precalculus and 43.115 College Algebra and Trigonometry.
Prerequisite: MATH 123 College Algebra or a satisfactory score on the mathematics placement examination.

MATH 208 Biostatistics
A course that covers statistical methods as they apply to the biological, health, and food sciences. The major emphasis is on hypothesis testing, including regression and analysis
of variance. Descriptive statistics is also included. The statistical package Minitab is used.
Note: A student may not receive credit for both MATH 208 Biostatistics and MATH 117 Introduction to Statistics or BIOL 304 Biometrics.
Prerequisite: One credit-bearing course in college mathematics.

MATH 215 Finite Mathematics
A study of mathematical models in various disciplines. Topics include logic, sets, functions, combinatorics, probability, matrices, Markov chains, linear programming, game theory, and digraphs. Prerequisite: MATH 200 Precalculus or permission of the instructor.

MATH 219 Calculus I (Gen. Ed. Goal 2)
A study of functions, limits, continuity, the derivative, rules of differentiation of algebraic, trigonometric, exponential and logarithmic functions, applications of differentiation, definite and indefinite integrals, and the Fundamental Theorem of Calculus.
Prerequisite: Completion of MATH 200 Precalculus with a minimum grade of C (2.00) or better, or a satisfactory score on the mathematics placement examination.

MATH 220 Calculus II
A study of the applications of integration, first-order linear and separable differential equations, techniques of integration, improper integrals, sequences, series, and Taylor and Maclaurin Series. Prerequisite: Completion of MATH 219 Calculus I with a minimum grade of C- (1.70) or better.

MATH 221 Calculus III
A study of conic sections; vectors in two and three dimensions; dot and cross products and their applications to geometry; equations of lines and planes; quadratic surfaces; polar, cylindrical, and spherical coordinates; and functions of several variables, partial derivatives, differentials, directional derivatives, gradients, optimization problems, multiple integrals and their applications. Prerequisite: MATH 220 Calculus II.

MATH 222 Differential Equations
A study of the methods for solving linear and elementary nonlinear differential equations with special emphasis on applications in the sciences. Topics covered include equations of the variable separable type; exact, homogeneous and Bernoulli equations; the method of substitution; approximation methods; linear equations; series techniques; Laplace transforms; systems of equations; and the Sturm-Liouville theory.
Prerequisites: MATH 220 Calculus II and MATH 226 Linear Algebra and Applications.

MATH 226 Linear Algebra and Applications
A study of vector spaces, subspaces, linear dependence, bases, dimension, linear mappings, linear equations, matrices, inner products and norms, determinants, quadratic forms, and the spectral theorem. Applications to various fields outside of mathematics are examined.
Prerequisites: MATH 215 Finite Mathematics and MATH 219 Calculus I.

MATH 231 Euclidean Geometry
An investigation of the various approaches to the study of Euclidean geometry including the metric and synthetic approaches as axiomatic systems. Topics include Polyhedra, tessellations, symmetry groups, and coordinate geometry. Geometric proofs are
emphasized throughout the course. An introduction to non-Euclidean geometries allows for comparisons to and contrasts with Euclidean geometry.
Prerequisite: MATH 215 Finite Mathematics.

MATH 292 Discrete Mathematics I
A mathematical foundation for computer science. Topics include logic, boolean algebra, sets, functions, sequences, and summations, matrices, mathematical induction, study of algorithms, recursion, combinatorics, graphs, and trees.
Note: A student may not receive credit for both MATH 292 Discrete Mathematics I and MATH 320 Discrete Mathematics.
Prerequisites: MATH 200 Precalculus and CSCI 252 Computer Science II Using Java, or permission of the instructor.

MATH 294 Discrete Mathematics II
A study of discrete mathematical structures. Topics include a brief review of sets and an exploration of relations, graphs, trees, digraphs, finite-state machines, formal languages, boolean algebra, and combinatorial circuits.
Prerequisite: MATH 292 Discrete Mathematics I.

MATH 301 Problem Solving and Modeling in Mathematics
A study in problem solving with the development of banks of problems appropriate to various grade levels and selected from arithmetic, informal geometry, logic, measurement, number sequences, probability, and statistics, challenging enough to provoke interest, but realistic enough for successful experiences. Heuristics, problem solving techniques, Polya’s stages of problem solving, specific strategies, and pedagogical issues are studied.
Prerequisite: MATH 215 Finite Mathematics.

MATH 307 Intermediate Statistics
A study of regression and correlation analysis, chi square tests and contingency tables, design of experiments, analysis of variance, non-parametric statistics, and introduction to data analysis. Prerequisite: MATH 117 Introduction to Statistics or MATH 208 Biostatistics.

MATH 308 Applied Statistical Data Processing
Practical aspects of data analysis using statistical computer packages such as MINITAB, SPSSX, AND BMDP. Multivariate statistical methods including multiple regression, analysis of covariance, factor analysis, multidimensional scaling, discriminant analysis and linear models for cross-classified categorical data are emphasized. Students do individual data analysis projects.
Prerequisite: MATH 307 Intermediate Statistics.

MATH 310 Number Theory
A study of properties of numbers. Topics include mathematical induction, divisibility, primes, congruences, the Chinese remainder theorem, primitive roots, quadratic reciprocity, continued fractions, partitions, and history of classical problems.
Prerequisite: MATH 215 Finite Mathematics and MATH 220 Calculus II.

MATH 313 Numerical Methods
A study of topics from elementary numerical analysis: finite differences, solution of equations, interpolation, numerical integration, and numerical linear algebra. Computer exercises and applications. This course is recommended as preparation for the numerical analysis half of the Part 3 Actuarial Exam.
Prerequisite: MATH 220 Calculus II and and one (1) computer science course. Recommended: MATH 226 Linear Algebra and Applications.

MATH 317 Higher Geometry
A precise, rigorous examination of the axioms and concepts of various geometries. Euclidean, non-Euclidean, and transformational geometries are investigated. Ruler-compass constructions are discussed.
Prerequisite: MATH 231 Euclidean Geometry.

MATH 319 Abstract Algebra
A study of algebraic structures and related concepts including groups, rings, integral domains, fields, and polynomials. Note: Students may not receive credit for both MATH 319 Abstract Algebra and 43.335 Algebraic Structures I.
Prerequisite: MATH 226 Linear Algebra and MATH 310 Number Theory.

MATH 331 Principles of Actuarial Mathematics
An introduction to mathematical applications in the actuarial fields of theory of interest and survival analysis. Topics from the theory of interest include simple and compound interest, annuities, amortization schedules, and sinking funds. Topics from survival analysis include death rates, standardized mortality ratios, common survival distributions, cohorts, and current and select life tables.
Prerequisites: MATH 220 Calculus II and one (1) statistics course. Recommended: One (1) computer science course.

MATH 427 Real Analysis
Set theory, relations and functions, properties of the real number system, topology of thereal line, introduction to metric spaces, limits of sequences and functions, continuous functions, differentiation, and the Riemann-Stieltjes integral.
Prerequisite: MATH 221 Calculus III.

MATH 490 Directed Study
Student research on a topic or topics in higher mathematics or computer science. Suggested areas include applied algebra, numerical analysis, and mathematical physics. The student should make arrangements with the faculty member who is to direct the work one semester in advance of the work.

MATH 495 Internship in Mathematics
The student is encouraged (and assisted to whatever extent possible) by the Mathematics Department to seek employment during summers or part time during the school year, involving non-trivial applications of mathematics. In this manner the student can earn up to three (3) course credits, the amount of credit being decided by the student’s advisor and the department chair.
Prerequisite: Approval of the chair.

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