Psychology Course Descriptions
PSYC 101 General Psychology
An introduction to the basic concepts of psychology including research methods in psychology, biological bases of behavior, learning, memory, development, social psychology and psychopathology. Students are exposed to principles, issues, theories and research findings in these areas.

PSYC 200 Psychology of Development
An overview of major theories of development from the prenatal period through
adolescence. Topics include the work of Piaget, Erikson, Kohlberg, Bronfenbrenner,
Vygotsky, and brain research. Normative patterns in areas such as physical growth,
cognition, morality, emotion, language acquisition, and socialization are addressed within
the cultural context of the family. Interrelationships between cognitive developments and
other developmental domains are stressed. Discussions and field applications encourage
the critical evaluation of theoretical and normative information.
Prerequisites: Sophomore status and status as a Coordinate Education major or Education
minor.

PSYC 201 Child Development
An introduction to the study of the child from conception to the onset of adolescence.
Basic concepts and theories of child development are studied, particularly those relevant
to the psychological processes of perception, cognition, social interaction, and affective
and moral development.
Prerequisite: PSYC 101 General Psychology or PSYC 200 Psychology of Development
or sophomore status.

PSYC 212 Adolescent Development
An introduction to the study of the adolescent from the onset of puberty to the beginnings
of adulthood. Topics include biological changes, identity development, the adolescent's
relations with parents and peers, cognitive changes, moral development, achievement,
and work issues. Special topics may include sexuality, drug abuse, delinquency, and
psychopathology examined in the context of the adolescent's formation of his or her
identity. Within each topic of development, current research findings regarding the
specific issues of race, class, and gender as they apply to adolescent development are
discussed.
Prerequisite: PSYC 101 General Psychology or PSYC 200 Psychology of Development or sophomore status.

PSYC 215 Psychology of Personality
A comprehensive survey of the major classical and contemporary theories of personality. The course includes a critical analysis of how individual differences are assessed within each theoretical framework. Situational and cultural implications for family, work, therapy, and education are considered.
Prerequisite: PSYC 101 General Psychology or PSYC 200 Psychology of Development.

PSYC 224 Social Psychology
An introduction to the factors and processes involved in people’s understanding of
themselves, others, and social interactions. Attention is given to research in such
areas as social perception, gender, group interaction, attitude formation and change, aggression, social influence, interpersonal attraction, prejudice and discrimination, and pro-social behavior with particular emphasis given to differences relating to gender, race, and class.
Prerequisite: PSYC 101 General Psychology or sophomore status.

BIOL/PSYC 225 Biopsychology
An overview of the biological foundations of behavior and mental processes. Topics
covered include the biological underpinnings or various domains in psychology such as
emotion, motivation, perception, cognitive function, psychopharmacology, and hormone
effects on the brain and behavior. No Laboratory.
Prerequisite: PSYC 101 General Psychology and one of the following biology courses:
BIOL 101 Biology Concepts, BIOL 142 Human Biology, or BIOL 161 Cellular and
Molecular Biology; or permission of instructor.

PSYC 231 Adult Development
An introduction to factors and issues affecting the development of individuals from young adulthood through the senior years. Topics may include developmental changes in sensory and biological processes, cognition, personality, familial and peer relationships, vocational and recreational goals, and bodily and mental health.
Note: Students cannot receive credit for both this course and either both PSYC 213 Psychology of Adult Development and PSYC 214 Psychology of Aging.
Prerequisite: PSYC 101 General Psychology or PSYC 200 Psychology of Development
or sophomore status.

PSYC 236 Psychology ofLearning
An introduction to human learning from early conceptions to current psychological theories. Basic concepts and theories of learning are examined including classical conditioning, instrumental learning, operant conditioning, and social learning theory. Animal studies serve as the b ackground for addressing current research in human behavior.
Prerequisite: PSYC 101 General Psychology or PSYC 200 Psychology of Development.

PSYC 245 Health Psychology
An introduction to the biological, psychological, and social factors related to the promotion of health and the prevention of illness.  The body's nervous, endocrine, digestive, and circulatory systems will be explored as well as how they can influence and be influenced by exercise, addiction, diet, stress, and social factors. The reciprocal interaction of the mind and body is emphasized.
Note: Students cannot receive credit for both this course and PSYC 208 Health Psychology.
Prerequisite: PSYC 101 General Psychology or PSYC 200 Psychology of Development, or sophomore status.

PSYC 259 Cultural Psychology
An introduction to the importance of culture and ethnicity in explaining what were once
considered universal psychological behaviors and processes. This course focuses on topics such as intercultural communication, research methods, cognition, gender, health, emotion, language, personality, abnormal psychology, and developmental processes across cultures and ethnicities.
Note: Students cannot receive credit for both this course and PSYC 340 Cultural Psychology.
Prerequisite: PSYC 101 General Psychology or PSYC 200 Psychology of Development.

PSYC 263 Cognitive Psychology
An introduction to the experimental study of mental processes that underlie perception,
attention, memory, reasoning, and problem solving. These processes are considered from
a variety of perspectives that may include computational, neuroscientific, parallel
processing, and developmental. Emphasis is placed on methodological issues, theoretical
interpretations, and practical applications. Note: Students cannot receive cr
edit for both this course and either PSYC 262 Learning, Memory and Cognition or PSYC 362
Cognitive Psychology.
Prerequisite: PSYC 101 General Psychology or PSYC 200 Psychology of Development.

PSYC 271 Principles of Behavior Modification
A consideration of various applications of learning theory and conditioning principles to
social and individual problems. Techniques such as systematic desensitization, aversive
conditioning, social modeling, token economies, and self -control procedures (e.g.,
biofeedback) are described. The application of these techniques is examined for a variety
of problems, e.g., anxiety, psychotic and antisocial behaviors, phobias, alcoholism,
smoking, and sexual dysfunction.
Prerequisite: PSYC 101 General Psychology or PSYC 200 Psychology of Development.

PSYC 280 Sensation and Perception
A study of how sensory organs transform physical energy in the environment into the
psychological experience of perception. The neurophysiological processes involved in
sensation and perception are highlighted. Topics include the structure and function of the
visual cortex; color, motion, and depth perception; sound localization, and speech perception.
Prerequisite: PSYC 101 General Psychology or PSYC 200 Psychology of Development.

PSYC 286 Psychology of Women
An examination of the psychological development of women from birth through maturity. Topics may include biological bases of psychological sex differences; sex roles in work, family, and social relations; the historical context of stereotypes and attitudes toward women; development of women’s self concept; and cross -cultural comparisons.
Prerequisite: PSYC 101 General Psychology or PSYC 200 Psychology of Development.

PSYC 291 Research I: Descriptive and Correlational Methods
An introduction to psychology as a science with a focus on descriptive and predictive
 research methods. Quantitative approaches including observational, survey, and correlational designs are covered, and qualitative approaches may also be introduced. Students conduct empirical research individually and/or in groups. Students develop skills in locating and understanding published research, formulating research questions, collecting data, following ethical guidelines, using statistical software to analyze findings, preparing written APA (American Psychological Association) - style reports, and presenting their research in poster and/or presentation formats.
Note: Students may not receive credit for both this course and PSYC 251 Psychology Research I: Methods.
Prerequisites: PSYC 101 General Psychology or PSYC 200 Psychology of Development, MATH 117 Introduction to Statistics, and sophomore status. Psychology majors only.

PSYC 304 Psychology of Careers
An introduction to research on career development and the contemporary workforce.
The course provides an overview of the major theories of career choice, including trait-factor,
developmental, and sociological approaches. The structure of vocational interests, values, personality, and abilities is discussed. Finally, research on contemporary aspects of work
is introduced, with possible topics including work-family conflict, the virtual workplace, downsizing, job search strategies, changing psychological contracts, and the contingent
workforce.
Prerequisites: Declared Psychology major or minor;and at least second-semester sophomore status; and completion of the Sociocultural Domain and one (1) of the other three (3) remaining
Domains.

PSYC 305 Human Relations
Designed to provide students with an opportunity to study and to experience the small
group situation in which the focus is on understanding the dynamics of interpersonal
behavior and on developing communication skills. Topics include self-concept, person
perception, verbal and non-verbal communication, and conflict resolution.
Note: Students cannot receive credit for PSYC 3XX Human Relations and either PSYC 258 Human Relations or PSYC 305 Human Relations.
Prerequisites: Completion of the Sociocultural Domainand one (1)of the other three (3) remaining
Domains.

PSYC 310 Psychological Testing
An introduction to the methods used in constructing and standardizing psychological
tests. This course provides an overview of the many different varieties of tests, ranging
from standardized tests of aptitude and achievement to individually administered projective tests. The use of psychological tests in schools, industry, social service agencies, and clinics is discussed.
Note: Students who have taken PSYC 275 Introduction to Psychological Testing cannot receive credit for PSYC 310 Psychological Testing.
Prerequisites: Completion of General Education Goal 2 requirement; and completion of two (2) Domains.

PSYC 313 Developmental Disabilities
The study of disorders commonly observed in infants and children. Disorders resulting from genetic abnormalities and environmental factors are studied, including mental retardation, cystic fibrosis, sickle -cell anemia, fetal alcohol syndrome, prematurity, failure-to- thrive, and learning disabilities. Current interventions and treatments are examined.
Prerequisites: Comp letion of the Developmental Domain and one (1) of the other three (3) remaining Domains.

PSYC 318 Educational Psychology
An advanced course on psychological research topics relevant to the classroom, such as
achievement, motivation, self-esteem, creativity and intelligence, testing and assessment,
and peer relationships. An examination of issues relevant to gender, race, and social class
within educational settings are included from a psychological perspective. The psychological implications of school transitions, mainstreaming of special needs students, tracking, sports and extracurricular activities, and clinical disorders manifested in the classroom may be covered.
Prerequisites: Completion of the Developmental Domain and one (1) of the other three (3) remaining Domains.

PSYC 322 Abnormal Psychology
An examination of some of the behaviors classified as abnormal by the most recent
version of the Diagnostic Statistical Manual (DSM). Problems in defining abnormality
are discussed, and such major theoretical approaches to causation and treatment as the
biological, psychoanalytic, behavioristic, and humanistic are compared. Opportunity for
field trips or field experience may be offered.
Prerequisite: Completion of two (2) of the four Domains.

PSYC 338 Industrial-Organizational Psychology
An introduction to psychological principles applied to the workplace and the field of
industrial-organizational psychology. Possible topics include job analysis, test development, selection procedures, training, per formance appraisal, job satisfaction, motivation, leader ship, work stress, and careers. Research, practical applications, and cultral influences on work behavior are discussed.
Prerequisites: Completion of General Education Goal 2 requirement; and completion of the Sociocultural Domain and one (1) of the other three (3) remaining Domains.

PSYC 341 Group Dynamics
An examination of the structure, function, and interactive processes of groups. Research methods appropriate for the study of groups are stressed, and research findings are discussed. Special attention is given to interaction patterns and to personality attributes that influence modes of group interaction.
Prerequisites: Completion of the Sociocultural Domain and one (1) of the other three (3) remaining Domains.

PSYC 345 Directed Study in Psychological Research
An opportunity for the advanced student in psychology to participate as a research
assistant in a faculty-initiated and directed project. Ability to work with a degree of
independence and to complete assigned tasks in accordance with the instructor’s
guidance is expected. The instructor is responsible for specifying the research topic(s),
materials, and methodology. The student and the supervising professor are responsible
for determining a contract that identifies the course objectives and the means for
evaluating the student’s performance. The course may be taken twice to allow students to
pursue projects that require more than one semester, or to work closely with more than
one faculty member.
Prerequisites: Junior Status,and completion of two (2) of the four (4) Domains as specified by the instructor of record, and approval of the department chair. Psychology majors only.

PSYC 348 Cognitive Neuropsychology
An advanced study of human cognitive processes and the brain imaging techniques used
to measure them. Topics include hemispheric specialization, consciousness, object recognition, working memory, attention, and brain damage/dysfunction. Clinical neuropsychology and comparative neuropsychology are introduced. The course emphasizes the relationship between theory and experimental research.
Prerequisites: Completion of the Biological Domain and one (1) of the other three (3) remaining
Domains or a 200-level Biology laboratory course; or permission of the instructor.

PSYC 353 Topics in Human Services
Designed primarily for psychology majors who are completing a concentration in human
services or who plan to take the PSYC 495 Internship in Psychology course with a
placement in a human services agency. Topics include ethical issues, interviewing
techniques, observational methods, communication skills applicable to counseling
techniques, government regulations, and other topics relevant to effective functioning in a
human services setting.
Prerequisite: Junior Status,and completion of the Sociocultural Domain and one (1)of the other three (3) remaining Domains; or permission of the instructor. Psychology majors only.

PSYC 355 Contemporary Issues in Psychology
An in-depth examination of a current psychological issue with particular emphasis on the
contributions of recent research. Topic and instructor are announced each year.
Prerequisites: Junior Status, and completion of two (2) of the four (4) Domains as specified by the instructor of record. Psychology majors only.

PSYC 369 Human Sexuality
An examination of human sexual development. Issues in development of sexuality are
presented from both a theoretical and research basis emphasizing psychological, biological, environmental, and c ultural perspectives. Students are required to master the
literature on social policy issues around topics that may include abortion, pornography,
AIDS and the right to privacy, homosexuals and parenting, forced sexual behavior,
contraception and sex, private sex between consenting adults, incest, and the decriminalization of prostitution.
Note: Credit is not given for both this course and CONS 270 Human Sexuality Education.
Prerequisites: Junior status, and completion of two (2) of the four (4) Domains, and any one of the following courses: PHIL 102 Introduction to Ethics, PHIL 105 Introduction to Political and Social Philosophy, or PHIL 118 Introduction to Philosophy of Science; or permission of the instructor.

PSYC 370 Developmental Psychopathology
The study of functional disorders commonly originating before the age of 21. Psychiatric
disorders resulting from genetic abnormalities and from environmental factors are
studied, including affective and anxiety disorders, adjustment and conduct d
isorders, and posttraumatic stress disorders. Current medical and therapeutic treatments are examined. Familiarity with both normal child and normal adolescent development is strongly
recommended.
Prerequisite: Completion of the Developmental Domain and one (1) of the other three (3) remaining Domains.

PSYC 391 Research II: Quasi-Experimental and Experimental Methods
An enhancement of student understanding of psychology as a science through advanced
quantitative research methods focused on quasi-experimental and experimental designs.
Students apply their knowledge and skills from PSYC 291 Research I: Descriptive and
Correlational Methods. Individually and/or in groups, students select or manipulate
independent variables, measure dependent variables, and control or account for
extraneous variables. Findings are analyzed using appropriate statistics, prepared in
written APA (American Psychological Association)-style reports, and disseminated inposter and/or presentation formats.
Note: Students may not receive credit for both PSYC 391 Research II: Quasi-Experimental and Experimental Methods and PSYC 351Psychology ResearchII: Design and Statistical Applications.
Prerequisites: Completion of PSYC 291 Research I: Descriptive and Correlational
Methods with a minimum grade of C-, and permission of instructor. Psychology majors only.

PSYC 403 Practicum in Teaching of Psychology
An opportunity to serve as a teaching assistant on campus in a psychology course under
the close supervision of the course instructor. Teaching assistants typically conduct class
discussions, prepare class materials and demonstrations, assist in construct
ion of examinations, and confer with students.
Prerequisite: Approval of the supervising course instructor. Psychology majors only.

PSYC 450 Empirical Research Thesis in Psychology
A culminating academic experience for Psychology majors during which studen
ts apply research methodology to the study of psychological topics. Working alone or in small
groups, students complete at least one original empirical research project through stages
of the research process, such as review of literature, hypothesis formulation, research
design, data collection and analysis, and drawing conclusions. As one of the capstone
courses for the major, students continue to develop their ability to think within the
discipline, and they refine their communication skills through oral
and written reports. They also apply and/or integrate knowledge about the scientific method, ethics, and diversity. Students create a final product for public dissemination.
Research methods, content, and supervision structure may vary by instructor.
Prerequisites: Second-semester junior status, completion of PSYC 391 Research II: Quasi-
Experimental and Experimental Methods with a minimum grade of C-, completion of one additional 300-level psychology course, and permission of instructor.
Psychology majors only.

PSYC 460 History and Systems of Psychology
A culminating academic experience for Psychology majors during which students
investigate the history of psychology from early Greek philosophers to present day
researchers and discuss the future of psychology. To understand core principles in the
field, students read original historical and contemporary works. As one of the capstone
courses for the major, students continue to develop their ability to think within the
discipline, and they refine their communication skills through oral and written reports.
They also apply and/or integrate knowledge about the scientific method, ethics, and
diversity. Students create a final project for public dissemination.
Note: Students cannot receive credit for this co urse and either PSYC 360 History and Systems of Psychology or PSYC 402 History and Systems of Psychology.
Prerequisites: Second-semester junior status, completion of PSYC 391 Research II: Quasi-Experimental and Experimental Methods with a minimum grade of C-, completion
of one (1) additional 300-level psychology course, and completion of one (1) of the
following: PHIL 102 Introduction to Ethics, PHIL 105 Introduction to Political and
Social Philosophy, or PHIL 118 Introduction to Philosophy of Science. Psychology majors only.

PSYC 480 Psychology Seminar
A culminating academic experience for Psychology majors during which students read
original research and theoretical papers covering a single area in psychology and take an
active role in leading class discussions. Laboratory or field research may be required. As
one of the capstone courses for the major, students continue to develop their ability to
think within the discipline, and they refine their communication skills through oral and
written reports. Theyalso apply and/or integrate knowledge about the scientific method,
ethics, and diversity. Students create a final project for public dissemination.
Topic and instructor to be announced each semester.
Note: Students cannot receive credit for both this course and PSYC 451 Psychology Seminar.
Prerequisites: Second-semester junior status, completion of 391 Research II: Quasi-Experimental and Experimental Methods with a minimum grade of C-, and completion ofone (1) additional 300-level psychology course.
Psychology majors only.

PSYC 490 Advanced Independent Study in Psychology
An opportunity for the advanced student in psychology to conduct an in-
depthinvestigation of a special topic or to carry out original research. Ability to work with a
high degree of independence is expected. The student is responsible for arranging with
the cooperating professor a contract that will specify topics or material to be covered,
methods of study, and method of evaluation. The course may be taken twice to allow the
student to pursue a project that requires more than one semester, or to work closely with
more than one faculty member.
Prerequisites: Junior status, completion of PSYC 391 Research II: Quasi-Experimentaland Experimental Methods with a minimum grade of C-, completion
of one (1) additional 300-level psychology course, and approval of the supervising professor and department Chair. Psychology majors only.

PSYC 495 Internship in Psychology
A culminating academic experience for Psychology majors during which students work in a supervised field placement. The field work involves a minimum of 8 hours per week
(120 hours total) in an applied setting such as a community service agency, school, clinic,
hospital, research facility or business. Students are responsible for securi
ng a placement and presenting it to the course instructor for approval. The field work is supported by class meetings on campus, and career planning is integrated into the course. As one of the capstone courses for the major, students continue to develop their ability to think within the discipline, and they refine their communication skills through oral and written reports.
They also apply and/or integrate knowledge about the scientific method, ethics, and diversity. Students create a final project for public dissemination. Students are encouraged to work with Career Services and Employer Relations for guidance on the internship search process.
Prerequisites: Junior status, completion of PSYC 391 Research II: Quasi-Experimental and Experimental Methods with a minimum grade of C-, completion of one (1) additional 300-level psychology course,and permission of instructor. Psychology majors only.

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