Course Descriptions

World Languages Course Descriptions

(Course listing and descriptions are subject to change. Please see the official academic catalog for the most updated version.)

AMERICAN SIGN LANGUAGE COURSE DESCRIPTIONS

ASGN 101 American Sign Language I (Gen. Ed. Domain I-C)

An introductorion to language and culture designed to provide beginners with basic American sign language vocabulary and syntax and an appreciation to deaf culture and deaf history. Opportunities to interact with the deaf community are provided. Students give class presentations and complete a research paper by the end of the semester.

ASGN 102 American Sign Language II (Gen. Ed. Domain I-C)

A continuation of the study of language and culture designed to provide beginners with basic functional language skills and an appreciation of Deaf culture. Students continue to expand vocabulary and concepts acquired in ASGN 121 American Sign Language I. Expansion of conversational range includes talking about other people and activities, giving directions, and making requests. Students develop discourse skills appropriate for establishing connections with deaf acquaintances and handling a variety of interruptions. Through in-class discussions and demonstrations, videotapes, and course readings, students are exposed to elements of Deaf culture and the Deaf Community.

Prerequisite: ASGN 101 American Sign Language I or permission of the instructor.

ASGN 221 American Sign Language/English Interpreting I

Designed to develop the cognitive and analytical skills required in interpreting (listening for meaning, recall, prediction, closure); paraphrasing and restructuring practice; written, spoken, and signed translation; practice in shifting linguistic register; expansion of English vocabulary; introduction to theoretical models of the interpreting process. Historical foundations of the profession will be reviewed.

Prerequisite: Advanced American Sign Language II or equivalent skills as determined through assessment.

ASGN 222 American Sign Language/English Interpreting II

A study of theoretical models of the interpreting process as well as strategies in interpreting. It fosters development of skill in consecutive and simultaneous interpreting of narratives and dialogic texts. Students are exposed to strategies for interpreting for Deaf individuals with limited or no vision. Students also get practice in managing the logistics of a variety of environmental configurations.
Prerequisite: ASGN 221 American Sign Language: English Interpreting I.

ASGN 301 Advanced American Sign Language III

Designed to help students achieve superior levels of proficiency in expressive and receptive skills. Students gain practice in using advanced features of grammar, prosody and classifiers, as well as the vocabulary used in academic, professional, political and abstract discourse. Students learn to present on complex or abstract topics requiring lengthy, connected and detailed discourse. Exposure to a variety of American Sign Language users presenting on a range of topics and registers expands students’ receptive skills.

Prerequisite: Advanced American Sign Language II or equivalent skills as determined through assessment.

ASGN 302 Advanced American Sign Language IV

A continuation of ASGN 301 Advanced American Sign Language III. It is designed to help students achieve a professional level of proficiency in expressive and receptive skills. Prerequisite: ASGN 301 Advanced American Sign Language III.

ASGN 313 American Sign Language/English Interpreting III

A continuation of ASGN 312 American Sign Language: English Interpreting II. Students further their abilities in consecutive and simultaneous interpreting of expository and procedural texts, including academic texts and in interpreting for Deaf/Blind individuals. Students experience the dynamics of teamed assignments through reading and in-class application. Students continue to practice managing environmental logistics.

Prerequisite: ASGN 312 American Sign Language: English Interpreting II. 

ASGN 314 American Sign Language/English Interpreting IV

Focused on interpreting in specialized settings, including K-12 classrooms, theatrical and musical performances, religious settings, and vocational rehabilitation settings. This course also covers: transliteration, working with a Deaf interpreter, video relay work, and sight translation of written documents.

Prerequisite: ASGN 313 American Sign Language: English Interpreting III.

ASGN 451 Interpreting Practicum and Seminar I

An observational practicum with an assigned practicum supervisor. Emphasis is on the Demand-Control Schema and professional ethics as a framework for observations. Fieldwork is augmented by a weekly seminar in which the interpreter’s role and responsibilities, ethical standards, and models of interpreting are discussed. Issues of self- care are addressed.

Prerequisite: ASGN 212 Advanced American Sign Language IV and ASGN 314 American Sign Language: English Interpreting II.

ASGN 452 Interpreting Practicum and Seminar II

A practicum in which students continue to observe, but also provide interpreting under the supervision of professional interpreters; fieldwork is augmented by a weekly seminar. In addition to ethics and professional standards, the seminar addresses steps toward state and national credentialing, as well as business practices and continuing professional development.

Prerequisites: ASGN 313 American Sign Language: English Interpreting III and ASGN 451American Sign Language English Interpreting Practicum and Seminar I. 


CHINESE COURSE DESCRIPTIONS

CHIN 101 Elementary Chinese I (Gen. Ed. Domain I-C)

An integration of language and culture designed to provide beginners with basic functional language skills, both oral and written, and an appreciation of Chinese cultures.

CHIN 102 Elementary Chinese II (Gen. Ed. Domain I-C)

A continuation of the study of language and culture designed to provide beginners with basic functional language skills, both oral and written, and an appreciation of Chinese cultures. Prerequisite: Students must either complete CHIN 171 Elementary Chinese I or have the corresponding placement test score, or have prior approval of the instructor in order to enroll in this course.

CHIN 118 Chinese Writing System and Calligraphy (Gen. Ed. Domain I-B)

A survey of the Chinese writing system through analysis, interpretation, and practice for all majors. This course introduces the diachronic development of the Chinese writing system, from the oracle bone script, bronze script, seal scripts, to several modern scripts, and aims to stimulate students’ imagination and appreciation of the characters. Readings and discussions focus on the basic principles on which characters are formed and the various styles that have evolved over time. Students gain hands-on experience by practicing calligraphy, and strengthen their awareness of characters as a medium of visual communication and calligraphy as a visual art. Note: Completion of or concurrent enrollment in CHIN 171 Elementary Chinese I is recommended.

CHIN 201 Intermediate Chinese I (Gen. Ed. Domain I-C)

A review of basic grammatical structures and characters and continued work toward building competency in Chinese language and culture. Additional characters are added to sharpen reading, writing, listening and speaking skills, with the aim of transferring knowledge gained from the character pattern approach at the elementary levels to work with authentic Chinese texts at the advanced level.

Prerequisite: CHIN 102 Elementary Chinese II or permission of instructor.

CHIN 202 Intermediate Chinese II (Gen. Ed. Domain I-C)

A continuation of the language and culture skill building beyond CHIN 271 Intermediate Chinese I for which vocabulary and character knowledge are expanded for the advancement of speaking and writing skills. Students work with simple authentic texts to further their knowledge of Chinese culture.

Prerequisite: CHIN 201 Intermediate Chinese I or permission of instructor. 

CHIN 203 Chinese Culture Through Film

A survey of the Chinese society and culture presented in modern films. The selected films by directors from mainland China, Hong Kong, and Taiwan give students an overview of the features from historic times to the present. Topics include education, dynastic history, society, cuisine, religion, visual arts, performing arts, and cultural transformation. The course is conducted in English.

CHIN 222 Chinese Literature in English Translation

A survey of Chinese literature in English translation, including poetry, essays, fiction, and drama by significant writers. Students are expected to interpret and discuss works from different periods of Chinese literature, classical or modern, within their historical and social context. Topics may vary from semester to semester. The course is conducted in English.

CHIN 300 Chinese Linguistics

A study of essential linguistic features of the Chinese languages with a focus on Mandarin Chinese. Students engage in linguistic comparison and contrast between Chinese and English as well as among Chinese languages. Topics include a survey of current linguistic approaches and several core areas such as phonology, morphology, syntax, and pragmatics. Students gain a broad understanding of Chinese linguistics by the end of the course. The course also includes a component on language acquisition.

Prerequisite: CHIN 101 Elementary Chinese I or the equivalent placement test score, or or permission of instructor.

CHIN 301 Advanced Chinese Composition & Conversation I

A focus on proficiency building in speaking, listening, reading, and writing with particular attention given to expanding vocabulary in speaking and writing to build on prior competencies. Students also further develop cultural awareness through study of authentic texts. Conducted mainly in Chinese.

Prerequisite: CHIN 202 Intermediate Chinese II or permission of instructor.

CHIN 302 Advanced Chinese Composition & Conversation II

A further development of spoken and written language, including a review of pronunciation and grammar. Attention is given to the development of advanced reading and writing skills using authentic materials. Compositions and class discussions are based on topics of contemporary interest. Conducted in Chinese.

Prerequisite: CHIN 301 Advanced Chinese Composition and Conversation I, or permission of instructor.

CHIN 326 Contemporary Trends in the Sinophone World

An advanced course designed to introduce students to current trends in the Sinophone world, including China, Hong Kong, Taiwan, Malaysia, Singapore, and other parts of the world where Chinese is spoken. Topics include socio-economic issues, education, sports, environment, popular culture, and modern technology. Readings and media materials from both literary and non-literary sources are utilized. The class is conducted primarily in English with a Chinese language component. Topics vary from semester to semester. Prerequisite: CHIN 101 Elementary Chinese I or permission of the instructor.

CHIN 330 Business Chinese

A practical application of specialized vocabulary, patterns, and styles applicable in a business setting. Students develop skills for oral and written communication, negotiation, and other professional applications of Chinese.
Prerequisite: CHIN 202 Intermediate Chinese II or permission of the instructor.

CHIN 405 Chinese Language through Media

A survey and critical analysis of current events presented in authentic Chinese-language print media, broadcast news, and online media produced in various countries. Topics include social, political, economic, legal, and environmental issues. Students are expected to actively participate in class and engage in vigorous discussion in Chinese.

Prerequisite: CHIN 202 Intermediate Chinese II or permission of the instructor.

CHIN 438 Topics in Chinese Language and Literature

An advanced survey of Chinese literature, including poetry, essays, fiction, and drama by significant writers. Students are expected to read, interpret and discuss texts written in modern Chinese or classical Chinese within cultural contexts. Topics may vary from semester to semester. Readings and discussion are in Chinese.

Prerequisite: CHIN 301 Advanced Chinese Composition & Conversation I or permission of the instructor. 

CHIN 450 Seminar in Chinese

An advanced seminar on a topic – literary, linguistic, or cultural – directly related to Chinese or the Chinese-speaking world. Topics vary from semester to semester. Students are required to prepare several oral and written presentations in the seminar as well as a final written term report. Throughout the seminar, emphasis is placed on originality, creativity, and scholarship. The course is conducted in Chinese.

Prerequisite: CHIN 301 Advanced Chinese Composition & Conversation I or permission of the instructor.

CHIN 490 Independent Study in Chinese

An in-depth investigation of a topic in areas such as language, culture, linguistics, literature, or pedagogy, selected by the student under the guidance of a member of the World Languages Department. Regular meetings with the faculty advisor and a written report are required.

Prerequisites: Completion of two (2) Chinese courses at the 200-level or higher, and permission of the instructor.

CHIN 495 Internship Practicum in Chinese

A supervised practical experience which complements the course work of the student in a field study setting. The experience requires 140 on-site hours per credit, individual consultations with the advisor, and a research project. The internship counts as either one (1) or two (2) course-credits toward the major requirement, which may be taken during separate semesters.

Prerequisite: Admission to the internship is limited to World Languages majors with a minimum 3.00 GPA. 


FRENCH COURSE DESCRIPTIONS

FREN 101 Elementary French I (Gen. Ed. Domain I-C)

An integration of language and culture designed to provide beginners with basic functional language skills and an appreciation of Francophone culture. Note: Students with previous experience in the language are encouraged to take the placement test before enrolling in FREN 101.

FREN 102 Elementary French II (Gen. Ed. Domain I-C)

A continuation of the study of language and culture designed to provide beginners with basic functional language skills and an appreciation of Francophone culture.
Prerequisite: Students must complete FREN 101 or have the corresponding placement test score or prior approval of instructor in order to enroll in FREN 102.

FREN 201 Intermediate French I (Gen. Ed. Domain I-C)

An intermediate French course in which students are trained to become independently functional in the French language and knowledgeable about Francophone culture and thought. Discussions, in French, are based on cultural readings, tapes, and films. The course also includes a comprehensive grammar review.

Prerequisite: FREN 102 Elementary French II or the equivalent placement test score or prior approval of instructor.

FREN 202 Intermediate French II (Gen. Ed. Domain I-C)

A continuation of intermediate French I. Students gain further training in order to become independently functional in the French language and knowledgeable about Francophone culture and thought. Discussions, in French, are based on cultural readings, tapes, and films. The course also includes a comprehensive grammar review.

Prerequisite: FREN 201 Intermediate French I or the equivalent placement test score or prior approval of instructor.

FREN 300 Business French

Practical study of the various types of French written communication involving the world of business, “la langue commerciale’’, with the acquisition of its specialized vocabulary and translations from French to English and English to French. Facts concerning the French economy and the principal commercial and industrial exchanges throughout the Francophone world are studied.

Prerequisite: FREN 201 Intermediate French I, equivalent placement exam score, or prior approval of the instructor. 

FREN 301 Advanced French Composition & Conversation I

Designed to improve verbal fluency, listening comprehension, and written composition, with special attention to the finer points of grammar and elements of style. Classroom activities and assignments include small group improvisations, oral and written reports, and discussions on topics of contemporary French culture. Conducted in French. Prerequisite: FREN 201 Intermediate French I, equivalent placement exam score, or or prior approval of the instructor.

FREN 302 Advanced French Composition & Conversation II

A further development of spoken and written language, including a review of pronuciation and grammer. Classroom activities and assignments include small group improvisations, oral and written reports, and discussions on topics of contemporary French culture. Conducted in French.

Prerequisite: FREN 201 Intermediate French I, equivalent placement exam score, or or prior approval of the instructor.

FREN 306 Major French Writers I

An introduction to French literature from the Middle Ages through the seventeenth century. This course is conducted in French.
Prerequisite: FREN 201 Intermediate French I, equivalent placement exam score, or or prior approval of the instructor.

FREN 307 Major French Writers II

An introduction to French literature from the eighteenth through the twentieth centuries. This course is conducted in French. Major French Writers I is not a prerequisite for the course.
Prerequisite: FREN 201 Intermediate French I, equivalent placement exam score, or or prior approval of the instructor.

FREN 390 Special Topics in French Studies

An upper-level seminar on a topic - literary, linguistic, or cultural - directly related to the French language or the French-speaking world. Topics vary from semester to semester and students may take the course for credit more than one time when the topics are different. Students are required to prepare several oral and written presentations for the course as well as a final research paper. Throughout the semester, emphasis is placed on originality, creativity and scholarship. Conducted in French.

Prerequisite: One 300-level French course, or permission of the instructor.

FREN 452 French Intonation and Diction

A review of phonetics and intense practice in the correct speech patterns of the foreign language. Training in aural comprehension, memorizations and dramatizations, prepared or impromptu reports or debates, are some of the class activities.
Prerequisite: FREN 201 Intermediate French I, equivalent placement exam score, or or prior approval of the instructor.

FREN 490 Independent Study in French

An in-depth investigation into a topic in the areas of literature, culture, linguistics or pedagogy, selected by the student under the guidance of a member of the World Languages Department. Regular meetings with the faculty advisor are arranged. A written report is required. Limited to juniors and seniors.

Prerequisite: Advanced knowledge of French literature and culture. This course is not meant to be a replacement for major required courses.

FREN 495 Internship Practicum in French

A supervised practical experience which complements the course work of the student in a field study setting. The experience requires individual consultations with the advisor, and a research project. Admission to the internship is limited to seniors in World Languages and requires a 2.5 QPA. Offered on a quarter or full-semester basis, the internship counts as either one or two courses toward the major requirement, according to the number of hours devoted to the field experience. 


LINGUISTICS COURSE DESCRIPTIONS

LING 110 The Languages of the World (Gen. Ed. Domain III-C)

A global perspective of the 5,000 or so languages spoken today. The course examines the fundamental structure of human language and the factors involved in language diversity. Major topics include: the internal organization of language, the genetic and structural relationships of the world’s major languages, myths and misconceptions about language, the writing systems of the world, linguistic trends in multilingual societies, the effect of mass communication on world linguistic geography. Related topics include bilingualism, literacy, language planning, and language policies, with an emphasis on non-Western European languages and cultures.

LING 200 Language and Linguistics

An in-depth examination of essential linguistic features of languages. Major topics include phonology, morphology, syntax, and semantics, as well as areas such as language acquisition, language in society, and language and culture. Note: This course is required for all language majors.

LING 300 Romance Linguistics

A survey of the emergence and the evolution of the Romance languages from their immediate parent, Vulgar Latin, and an analysis of their current structure. The course examines the internal and external causes that brought about the various changes in pronunciation, word inflection, and word order, and presents contemporary data from which to apply methods of linguistic analysis. The course also includes a component on language acquisition.

LING 495 Internship/Practicum in World Languages

A supervised practical experience which complements the course work of the student in a field study setting. The experience requires individual consultations with the advisor and a research project. Admission to the internship is limited to seniors from the World Languages major and requires a 2.50 GPA. The internship counts as either one or two courses toward the major requirement, according to the number of hours devoted to the field experience.

LING 496 Internship in International Management

A semester of practical experience in an international business environment in this country or abroad, e.g., in a French or Spanish-speaking country. A written project is required. The students are advised and evaluated by members of the Modern Language and Economics departments. Admission to the internship is limited to seniors or second semester juniors and requires a 2.50 QPA. Students may earn up to 2 course credits applicable to the language minor and/or International Management Concentration, according to the number of hours devoted to the field experience. Credit will not be given for both LING 496 and LING 495.

Prerequisite: Approval of the department chairs. 


PORTUGUESE COURSE DESCRIPTIONS

PORT 101 Elementary Portuguese I (Gen. Ed. Domain I-C)

An integration of language and culture designed to provide beginners with basic functional language skills and an appreciation of Brazilian and Portuguese cultures.

PORT 102 Elementary Portuguese II (Gen. Ed. Domain I-C)

A continuation of the study of language and culture designed to provide beginners with basic functional language skills and an appreciation of Brazilian and Portuguese cultures. Prerequisite: Students must either complete PORT 101 or have the corresponding placement test score, or have prior approval of the instructor in order to enroll in this course.


RUSSIAN COURSE DESCRIPTIONS

RUSS 101 Elementary Russian I (Gen. Ed. Domain I-C)

An integration of language and culture designed to provide beginners with basic functional language skills and appreciation of Russian culture. Note: Students with previous experience in the language are encouraged to take the placement test before enrolling in this course. 

RUSS 102 Elementary Russian II (Gen. Ed. Domain I-C)

A continuation of the study of language and culture designed to provide beginners with basic functional language skills and appreciation of Russian culture.
Prerequisite: RUSS 101 Elementary Russian I or permission of the instructor. 


SPANISH COURSE DESCRIPTIONS

SPAN 101 Elementary Spanish I (Gen. Ed. Domain I-C)

An integration of language and culture designed to provide beginners with basic functional language skills and an appreciation of Hispanic cultures. Note: Students with previous experience in the language are encouraged to take the placement test before enrolling in SPAN 101.

SPAN 102 Elementary Spanish II (Gen. Ed. Domain I-C)

A continuation of the study of language and culture designed to provide beginners with basic functional language skills and an appreciation of Hispanic cultures.
Prerequisite: Students must complete SPAN 101 or have the corresponding placement test score or have prior approval of instructor in order to enroll in SPAN 102.

SPAN 201 Intermediate Spanish I (Gen. Ed. Domain I-C)

An intermediate Spanish course in which students are trained to become independently functional in the Spanish language and knowledgeable about Hispanic cultures and thought. Discussions are in Spanish and based on cultural materials. The course also includes a comprehensive grammar review.

Prerequisite: SPAN 102 Elementary Spanish I or the equivalent placement test score or prior approval of instructor.

SPAN 202 Intermediate Spanish II (Gen. Ed. Domain I-C)

A continuation of Intermediate Spanish I. Students gain further training in order to become independently functional in the Spanish language and knowledgeable about Hispanic cultures and thought. Discussions are in Spanish and based on cultural materials. The course also includes a comprehensive grammar review.

Prerequisite: SPAN 201 Intermediate Spanish I or the equivalent placement test score or prior approval of instructor.

SPAN 210 Cinema for Spanish Conversation (Gen. Ed. Domain I-C)

An intermediate conversation course designed to develop fluency and accuracy of comprehension, speaking, and writing through film and cultural analysis. Students explore several aspects of life and culture in the Spanish-speaking world and the United States including identity, history, politics, class issues, gender roles, regional language, and arts. Students improve their Spanish conversational skills and Spanish vocabulary through the discussion of Spanish-language films. Class conducted in Spanish.

Corequisite: SPAN 202 Intermediate Spanish II or permission of the instructor.

SPAN 320 Introduction to the Analysis of Hispanic Texts

An intermediate step between language-oriented courses and those dealing more exclusively with literature. In this course, students develop techniques for reading and interpreting Hispanic literary texts, including fictional narrative, drama, and lyric poetry. The course focuses on the consolidation of reading skills with an emphasis on acquisition of critical vocabulary and approaches to contemporary works from Spain and Latin America. Classes are conducted in Spanish.

Prerequisite: SPAN 202 Intermediate Spanish II or permission of instructor.

SPAN 331 Advanced Spanish Composition & Conversation I

A continuation in the development of spoken and written language, including a review of pronunciation and grammar. Attention is given to the finer points of grammar. Compositions and class discussions are based on Hispanic themes and on topics of contemporary interest.

Prerequisite: SPAN 202 Intermediate Spanish II, equivalent placement test score, or prior approval of the instructor.

SPAN 332 Advanced Spanish Composition & Conversation II

A further development of spoken and written language, including a review of pronunciation and grammar. Attention is given to the finer points of grammar. Compositions and class discussions are based on Hispanic themes and on topics of contemporary interest.

Prerequisite: SPAN 202 Intermediate Spanish II, equivalent placement test score, or prior approval of the instructor. 

SPAN 334 Spanish American Culture and Civilization

A survey of Spanish-American civilizations, studied chronologically from the pre- Columbian Maya, Aztec and Inca civilizations to the twentieth century, with emphasis on the Spanish conquest, the colonial period and the wars of independence. The predominant cultural currents and artistic developments are studied. Conducted in Spanish.

Prerequisite: SPAN 331 Advanced Spanish Composition & Conversation I or SPAN 332 Advanced Spanish Composition & Conversation II, or prior approval of the instructor.

SPAN 335 Major Hispanic Writers I

An historical and literary survey of peninsular and Latin American texts, focusing on works written during the evolution of the Spanish language in the Middle Ages through the colonial chronicles of the seventeenth century. Instruction and discussions are in Spanish. Prerequisite: SPAN 331 Advanced Spanish Composition & Conversation I or SPAN 332 Advanced Spanish Composition & Conversation II, or prior approval of the instructor.

SPAN 336 Major Hispanic Writers II

An historical and literary survey of Spanish language texts of eighteenth, nineteenth, and twentieth-century Spain and Latin America. Focus is on the literary periods of romanticism, realism/naturalism, and modernism. Instruction and discussions are in Spanish.

Prerequisite: SPAN 331 Advanced Spanish Composition & Conversation I or SPAN 332 Advanced Spanish Composition & Conversation II, or prior approval of the instructor.

SPAN 343 The Latin American Short Story: Love, Death, and Humor

An analytical study of selected Latin American short stories of the 19th and 20th centuries, with attention to the evolution of their forms and ideas within specific historical and social contexts. Classes are conducted in Spanish.
Prerequisite: SPAN 202 Intermediate Spanish II or permission of instructor.

SPAN 345 Tales of Mystery from Latin American

A close reading and analysis of selected Latin American mystery stories of the nineteenth and twentieth centuries. This course is designed for students to build vocabulary and gain practice in written expression. Readings and discussions are in Spanish.
Prerequisite: SPAN 202 Intermediate Spanish II or equivalent; or prior approval of instructor.

SPAN 431 Contemporary Trends in Spain

An advanced course designed to introduce students to philosophical and cultural concepts held in contemporary Spain. To this end, readings from both literary and non-literary sources are utilized with frequent reports, both oral and written, required in order to encourage the student to relate theory to practice.

Prerequisite: SPAN 331 Advanced Spanish Composition & Conversation I or SPAN 332 Advanced Spanish Composition & Conversation II, and one other 300- or 400-level Spanish course; or prior approval of the instructor.

SPAN 432 Contemporary Trends in Spanish-American Thought

An advanced course designed to introduce students to philosophical concepts often held by the Latin American residing both within and outside the United States. Due to greater cultural contact with the United States, emphasis is placed on Puerto Rican, Cuban and Mexican views. While readings are assigned from literary and nonliterary sources, the thrust of the course is practical, with frequent reports, both oral and written. Conducted in Spanish. Readings in both English and Spanish.

Prerequisites: SPAN 331 Advanced Spanish Composition and Conversation I or SPAN 332 Advanced Spanish Composition and Conversation II and two other 300- or 400-level Spanish courses; or prior approval of the instructor.

SPAN 435 The Boom in Latin American Literature

Selected readings in the literature of such noted Latin American authors as Borges, Donoso, Garcia Marquez, and Fuentes. Conducted in Spanish.
Prerequisites: SPAN 331 Advanced Spanish Composition and Conversation I or SPAN 332 Advanced Spanish Composition and Conversation II and two other 300- or 400-level Spanish courses; or prior approval of the instructor.

SPAN 436 Cervantes

Readings and discussion of Cervantes’ works with special emphasis on his masterpiece, Don Quixote. Conducted in Spanish.
Prerequisites: SPAN 331 Advanced Spanish Composition and Conversation I or SPAN 332 Advanced Spanish Composition and Conversation II and two other 300- or 400-level Spanish courses; or prior approval of the instructor. 

SPAN 437 Spanish Theatre and Poetry of the Twentieth Century

A critical study of the main trends of Spanish theater and poetry of the twentieth century. Conducted in Spanish.
Prerequisites: SPAN 331 Advanced Spanish Composition and Conversation I or SPAN 332 Advanced Spanish Composition and Conversation II and two other 300- or 400-level Spanish courses; or prior approval of the instructor.

SPAN 443 Spanish American Film

A study of Latin American and Caribbean cinema. The focus is on films that represent cultural values and issues in contemporary Latin American societies. Students learn to recognize cinematographic styles and techniques, as well as the differences among the cultures that are studied. Particular attention is paid to the themes of ethnicity, class, gender, sexual orientation, and politics. When appropriate, corresponding literary texts will be examined. Film viewing, class discussion, related readings and assignments are in Spanish.

Prerequisites: SPAN 331 Advanced Spanish Composition and Conversation I or SPAN 332 Advanced Spanish Composition and Conversation II and one other 300- or 400-level Spanish course; or prior approval of the instructor.

SPAN 445 Tales of the Fantastic from the Southern Cone

Selected twentieth-century short stories and novellas from Argentina and Uruguay, which focus on the scientific and psychological construction of alternate realities, are studied in their relation to the poetics of the fantastic. Classes are conducted in Spanish. Prerequisites: SPAN 331 Advanced Spanish Composition and Conversation I or SPAN 332 Advanced Spanish Composition and Conversation II and one other 300- or 400-level Spanish course; or prior approval of the instructor.

SPAN 446 Testimonial Literature of the Dirty War

A study of the legacy of State Terrorism, in which works written by the survivors of the concentration camps in Argentina twenty years after the end of the Dirty War (1974-1983) constitute the primary focus of the coursework. Readings of a variety of genres, and course instruction are in Spanish.

Prerequisite: SPAN 331 Advanced Spanish Composition and Conversation I or SPAN 332 Advanced Spanish Composition and Conversation II, or equivalent, or prior approval of the instructor.

SPAN 448 Controversial Cinema in Latin America

A study of "new wave" Latin American cinema. The focus of the course is on films that deal with controversial topics such as female violence, torture, the drug trade, sexuality issues and alternative families in contemporary Latin American societies. When appropriate, corresponding literary texts are examined. Film viewing, class discussions, related readings and assignments are in Spanish.

Prerequisite: SPAN 331 Advanced Spanish Composition and Conversation I or SPAN 332 Advanced Spanish Composition and Conversation II, or equivalent, or prior approval of the instructor.

SPAN 462 Spanish Intonation and Diction

A review of phonetics and intense practice in the correct speech patterns of the foreign language. Training in aural comprehension, memorizations and dramatizations, prepared or impromptu reports or debates, are some of the class activities.
Prerequisite: SPAN 202 Intermediate Spanish II.

SPAN 463 Seminar in Spanish

An advanced seminar on a topic - literary, linguistic, or cultural - directly related to Spanish or the Spanish-speaking world. Topics vary from semester to semester. Students are required to prepare several oral and written presentations to the seminar as well as a final written term report. Throughout the seminar, the emphasis is placed on originality, creativity, and scholarship. Conducted in Spanish.

Prerequisite: Open to junior and senior Modern Language majors who have completed at least 6 courses at the 300 level or higher, and to others with permission of the instructor.

SPAN 490 Independent Study in Spanish

An in-depth investigation of a topic in the areas of literature, culture, linguistics or pedagogy, selected by the student under the guidance of a member of the World Languages Department. Regular meetings with the faculty advisor are to be arranged. A written report is required. Note: Limited to juniors and seniors.

Prerequisite: Advanced knowledge of Spanish literature and culture. This course is not meant to be a replacement for major required courses. 

SPAN 495 Internship Practicum in Spanish

A supervised practical experience which complements the course work of the student in a field study setting. The experience requires individual consultations with the advisor, and a research project. Admission to the internship is limited to seniors in World Languages and requires a 2.50 QPA. Offered on a quarter or full-semester basis, the internship counts as either one or two courses toward the major requirement, according to the number of hours devoted to the field experience.