Sexual Harassment & Assault Prevention & Education

Letter to the Community 

Dear FSU Community,

Framingham State University seeks to SHAPE a campus environment free from all forms of sexual violence and intimate partner violence.  All members of our community deserve to be treated with respect and dignity and to be able to go to work, get their education, visit, and otherwise participate in life at the University without fear or harm.

When sexual harassment, sexual violence, domestic violence, dating violence, or stalking occur, it deeply wounds our entire community.  Therefore, we are committed to creating and sustaining a culture of prevention and education, where expectations are clear, reporting processes are easily navigable, resources are readily available, and perpetrators are held accountable for their actions.

The SHAPE website has been created and designed to serve as a central source of information for prevention and education of sexual harassment, sexual violence, relationship violence, and stalking including as it relates to Title IX, the Campus SaVE Act, the Clery Act, and University policy.

Please explore this site to learn more about our policies, how to identify and respond to problematic language or behavior, how to report concerns, resources accessible to members of the Framingham State community, and other useful information.

Through the ongoing dedication of many people in our community, we will continue to offer and expand educational opportunities and resources for students and employees.  We will continue to support all members of our community and promote a culture where sexual harassment and violence are not tolerated.  But we can't do it in isolation.  We need your participation, feedback, ideas, and commitment.  You might begin by reviewing bystander intervention techniques or learning how to support a survivor of sexual violence.  My door is always open for you to share your ideas or concerns.

Each of us has the power to SHAPE our community.  How will you?

Sincerely,

Kim R. Dexter
University Title IX Coordinator

titleix [at] framingham.edu

SHAPE Survey Findings

As required by M.G.L. c. 6, § 168D (e), Framingham State University conducts Sexual Misconduct Surveys at least once every four years and publicly posts the survey findings.  

2023 SHAPE Sexual Violence Survey Results

Bystander Intervention

EVERY PERSON CAN HAVE AN IMPACT

Each of us can send a clear message that sexual assault and relationship violence will not be tolerated, downplayed, or joked about, and that we, as a community, will react decisively if it does happen. We can talk about sexual assault and relationship violence and teach others that it is never ok.  And we can continue to educate ourselves and others about the issues.

Engaging Bystanders to Prevent Sexual Violence - Bulletin from the National Sexual Violence Resource Center 

Intervening: Knowing When and How to Respond - Tips from No More

BYSTANDER INTERVENTION TRAINING

FSU's bystander intervention curriculum, developed by our partner Voices Against Violence, teaches bystanders how to safely intervene in instances where someone is at risk of experiencing harm or causing harm to others.  This 50-minute program is delivered on campus throughout the year and can be provided upon request to campus groups and in the classroom.  Send training requests to titleix [at] framingham.edu.

ACTION ITEMS

  • Know that sexual assault occurs in our communities and that we can SHAPE safe and supportive communities through our actions.
  • Your safety is paramount.  It is always safest to intervene with others and from a distance.
  • Be willing to speak up in difficult situations.
    • Ask the person if they need help.
    • Defuse the situation through humor or distraction.
    • Be direct and tell someone if their behavior is out of line.
  • Do not assume that just because no one else speaks up, that everyone else is fine with what's happening.  
    • If you step up and speak out, others will likely back you up.  
  • Intervention does not have to mean conflict.  Sometimes it's enough to cause a distraction or just disrupt the current course of events.  Consider some of these options:
    • Turn on the lights/turn off the music at a party.
    • Spill a drink on the potential perpetrator or victim.
    • Ask the potential victim, if female, for a personal item like a tampon.
    • Let the potential victim know you're leaving and encourage them to leave with you.
    • Ask a friend of the potential perpetrator to pull them aside for something.
  • Discuss the issues of sexual assault, relationship violence, and stalking with friends or share information and resources through social media.
  • Be conscious of your use of language and choose words carefully.  Cultural messages have the ability to support or discourage violence.  
    • Challenge societal messages about what it means to be a man or a woman and show appreciation when someone challenges gender stereotypes.
    • Be aware of, and refuse to use, sexist, homophobic, and demeaning language.
  • Don’t joke about sexual assault; comments and jokes that are meant to “ease the tension” or are “just kidding around” can trivialize the severity of the behavior.
  • Know what you value and make it clear to friends and family.  Seeking out these positive traits in others allows you to identify and build healthy relationships. 
  • Share positive messages with friends and family.
  • Communicate with your own partner about physical/sexual wants and boundaries.
  • Remember that it's never too early or too late to do something.  

INDICATIONS A SEXUAL ASSAULT MAY OCCUR

  • A person has declared that they are intent on engaging in sexual activity with someone regardless of the status of the other person's knowledge or consent.
  • Someone has been pressured or encouraged to engage in sexual activity with as many people or as frequently as possible.
  • A person is providing excessive amounts of alcohol to someone with an intent to engage in sexual activity.
  • A person is about to engage in sexual activity with someone who is incapacitated by drugs or alcohol.
  • It appears that one party may be blacking out or unaware of their current situation.

IDENTIFYING RELATIONSHIP VIOLENCE

  • Insults, humiliating language or putting the person down in front of others.
  • Explosive temper, mood swings, or verbal abuse.
  • Jealousy or possessiveness.
  • Stalking behaviors such as following, watching from a distance, unwanted or excessive communication.
  • Invasion of privacy or obsessive tracking of the person's activities.  
  • Doesn't seem to care about what their partner wants.
  • Fear of displeasing partner.
  • Spending less time with friends.
  • Physical assault such as slapping, hitting, and punching.  

HELPING A SURVIVOR

  • Listen carefully, without judgment.
  • Do not blame. Believe the victim and make it clear the fault lies only with the abuser. 
  • Offer a safe place to stay.
  • Let the survivor make decisions about next steps. All control has been stripped from the victim during the assault. Allow the victim to make decisions about what steps to take next.
  • Assist in getting the treatment/services they need if they agree.
  • Remain calm. You might feel shock or rage, but expressing these emotions to the victim may cause the victim more trauma.
  • Encourage medical attention and counseling.
  • Refer them to the resources and reporting information available on the SHAPE website.
  • Seek help yourself.

Consent

The University's Title IX Sexual Harassment Policy requires Consent.

Consent is an understandable exchange of affirmative words or actions, which indicates a willingness by all parties to participate in mutually agreed upon sexual activity. Consent must be informed and freely and actively given. It is the responsibility of the initiator to obtain clear and affirmative responses at each stage of sexual involvement. Consent to sexual activity may be withdrawn at any time, as long as the withdrawal is communicated clearly.

Whether an individual has taken advantage of a position of influence over a Complainant may be a factor in determining consent. A position of influence could include supervisory or disciplinary authority.

Silence, previous sexual relationships or experiences, and/or a current relationship may not, in themselves, be taken to imply consent. While nonverbal consent is possible (through active participation), it is best to obtain verbal consent. Similarly, consent to one form of sexual activity does not imply consent to other forms of sexual activity.

Consent cannot be obtained through incapacitation, force, or coercion.

Incapacitation 

An individual who is incapacitated by alcohol and/or drugs both voluntarily or involuntarily consumed may not give consent. Alcohol or drug related incapacitation is more severe than impairment, being under the influence, or intoxication. Evidence of incapacity may be detected from context clues, such as slurred speech, bloodshot eyes, the smell of alcohol on the breath, shaky equilibrium, vomiting, unusual behavior or unconsciousness. While context clues are important in determining incapacitation, they alone do not necessarily indicate incapacitation.
Persons unable to consent due to incapacitation also include, but are not limited to: persons under age 16; persons who are intellectually incapable of understanding the implications and consequences of the act or actions in question; and persons who are physically helpless. A physically helpless person is one who is asleep, blacked out, involuntarily physically restrained, unconscious, or, for any other reason, unable to communicate unwillingness to engage in any act.

The use of alcohol or drugs to render another person mentally or physically incapacitated as a precursor to or part of a sexual assault is prohibited. The use of alcohol, medications or other drugs by the respondent or accused does not excuse a violation of this Policy.

Force 

The use of physical strength or action (no matter how slight), violence, threats of violence or intimidation (implied threats of violence) as a means to engage in sexual activity. A person who is the object of actual or threatened force is not required to physically, verbally or otherwise resist the aggressor.

Coercion 

Unreasonable pressure or emotional manipulation to persuade another to engage in sexual activity. When someone makes it clear that s/he does not want to engage in sexual behavior, or s/he does not want to go beyond a certain point of sexual activity, continued pressure beyond that point can be considered coercive. Being coerced into sexual activity is not consent to that activity.

Talk to Your Partner About Consent

Make consent part of the conversation with your partner.  You will be able to share your expectations, learn about what your partner enjoys, and put the brakes on before things go too far.  It can also be a fun way to get excited about your pending (and mutually agreed upon) intimacy.

How do you know you have consent? Here's some guidance to help you navigate your conversation about consent.  If you're ever unsure if you have consent, you don't.

YES messages (consent can be withdrawn at any time)

"Yes"
"That would be great!"
"That's what I want too."
"I want to…"
"I am ready to…"

NO messages

"No."
"Stop."
"Not now."
"Not tonight." (even if you've done it before)
"I've changed my mind."
"I'm not ready."
"I'm not sure."
"I don't know."
"I may have had too much to drink."
"I'm scared."
Incapacitation/Severe intoxication.
You don't think they would agree to have sex if they were sober.
You are too intoxicated to gauge consent.
Discomfort.
Lack of eye contact.
Crossed arms.
Silence.
Your partner is asleep.
You are using physical force or size to have sex.
You hope your partner will say nothing and go with the flow.
You have asked repeatedly or put pressure on them.

You Should Pause and Talk (because you do NOT have Affirmative Consent)

You are not sure what the other person wants.
You feel like you are getting mixed signals.
You have not talked about what you want to do.
You assume that you will do the same thing as before.
Your partner stops or is not responsive.

Definitions

Consent

An understandable exchange of affirmative words or actions, which indicates a willingness by all parties to participate in mutually agreed upon sexual activity. Consent must be informed and freely and actively given. It is the responsibility of the initiator to obtain clear and affirmative responses at each stage of sexual involvement. Consent to sexual activity may be withdrawn at any time, as long as the withdrawal is communicated clearly.

Whether an individual has taken advantage of a position of influence over a Complainant may be a factor in determining consent. A position of influence could include supervisory or disciplinary authority.

Silence, previous sexual relationships or experiences, and/or a current relationship may not, in themselves, be taken to imply consent. While nonverbal consent is possible (through active participation), it is best to obtain verbal consent. Similarly, consent to one form of sexual activity does not imply consent to other forms of sexual activity.

Consent to sexual activity may be withdrawn at any time, as long as the withdrawal is communicated clearly.

Intimate Partner Violence 

Intimate partner violence, sometimes also called relationship violence, and including domestic and dating violence, includes acts of abusive or coercive behavior (physical, sexual, financial, verbal and/or emotional) used by a perpetrator to gain or exercise control over another, including any behaviors that intimidate, manipulate, humiliate, isolate, frighten, threaten, blame, hurt, injure, or wound someone. Intimate partner violence can occur in relationships between persons of any gender.

Examples of intimate partner violence include, but are not limited to:

  • hitting, slapping, punching, kicking, pulling hair or other physical misconduct;
  • isolating a partner from family and friends;
  • destroying a roommate’s personal items;
  • physically assaulting the child of a partner;
  • pursuing sexual activity when a partner is not fully conscious, is not asked, or is afraid to say no, or coercing a partner to have sex without protection;
  • threatening to reveal a person’s sexual orientation without the person’s permission;
  • exhibiting excessive possessiveness and jealousy;
  • constantly belittling or insulting a partner;
  • checking a roommate’s cell phone or email account without permission;
  • demanding that a partner dress or act in a certain way; and/or
  • threatening violence against the victim’s acquaintances, friends, or family members.

The University's Title IX Sexual Harassment Policy specifically prohibits domestic and dating violence under the following definitions: 

Domestic violence

Includes felony or misdemeanor crimes of violence committed by a current or former spouse or intimate partner of the victim, by a person with whom the victim shares a child in common, by a person who is cohabitating with or has cohabitated with the victim as a spouse or intimate partner, by a person similarly situated to a spouse of the victim under the domestic or family violence laws of the jurisdiction receiving grant monies, or by any other person against an adult or youth victim who is protected from that person’s acts under the domestic or family violence laws of the jurisdiction.

Dating violence 

Any act of violence or threatened violence committed by a person who is or has been in a social relationship of a romantic or intimate nature with the victim; the existence of such a relationship shall be determined based on a consideration of the following factors: (i) the length of the relationship, (ii) The type of relationship, and (iii) the frequency of interaction between the persons involved in the relationship. This includes, but is not limited to, sexual, emotional or physical abuse, or the threat of such abuse.

Gender Based Harassment

Unwelcome conduct of a nonsexual nature based on a person’s actual or perceived sex, including conduct based on gender identity, gender expression, and nonconformity with gender stereotypes, and is prohibited when:

  • submission to such conduct is made either explicitly or implicitly a term or condition of an individual’s employment or education; and/or
  • submission to, or rejection of, such conduct by an individual is used as a basis for academic or employment decisions affecting that individual; and/or
  • such conduct has the purpose or effect of substantially interfering with an individual’s academic or professional performance or creating an intimidating, hostile, or offensive employment, educational, or living environment based on gender.

Examples of gender-based harassment include, but are not limited to:

  • using derogatory comments and terms toward a male or female who do not act in ways that align with their gender stereotype, such as a male being called names for being interested in the arts or a female being called names for being interested in construction;
  • telling someone to use a restroom that does not align with that person’s gender identity; and
  • making generalized derogatory comments about one gender, such as “all females” are ______ or “all males” are _______. 

Gender-based harassment is prohibited under the University's Policy Against Discrimination, Discriminatory Harassment, and Retaliation.

Retaliation

Adverse employment or educational action against any person making a complaint of discrimination, sexual assault, sexual harassment, gender-based harassment, domestic violence, dating violence, stalking and retaliation, assisting in making a complaint, resisting or openly opposing such conduct, or otherwise using or participating in the complaint investigation process under the Policy. Persons who file, or participate in the investigation or resolution of, claims or complaints of sexual assault, sexual harassment, gender-based harassment, domestic violence, dating violence, stalking and retaliation with outside agencies, law enforcement or otherwise pursuant to any applicable state or federal law, are also protected from retaliation.

Prohibited retaliation includes, but is not limited to: threats; intimidation; reprisals; continued harassment or misconduct; other forms of harassment; slander and libel; and adverse actions related to employment or education.

Retaliation can be committed by individuals or groups, including friends, relatives or other associates of the person against whom a complaint is filed. Retaliation, even in the absence of proven discrimination, sexual violence, sexual harassment, gender-based harassment, domestic violence, dating violence or stalking in an underlying complaint, constitutes a policy violation that is just as serious as the main offense itself.

Retaliation is prohibited under the University's Title IX Sexual Harassment Policy as well as the University's Policy Against Discrimination, Discriminatory Harassment, and Retaliation.

Sexual Assault 

An offense classified as a forcible or non-forcible sex offense under the uniform crime reporting system of the Federal Bureau of Investigation. Attempts to commit any of these acts are also prohibited.

Sexual Assault – Rape

The penetration, no matter how slight, of the vagina or anus, with any body part or object, or oral penetration by a sex organ of another person without the consent of the victim (or attempts to commit the same). This includes any gender of victim or Respondent.

Sexual Assault – Fondling

Fondling is the touching of the private body parts of another person for the purpose of sexual gratification, without the consent of the victim, including instances in which the victim is incapable of giving consent because of age and/or because of temporary or permanent mental incapacity

Statutory Rape

Sexual intercourse with a person who is under the statutory age of consent, which is 16 years old in Massachusetts.

Incest

Non-forcible sexual intercourse between persons who are related to each other within the degrees wherein marriage is prohibited by law.

Sexual Assault is prohibited by the University's Title IX Sexual Harassment Policy.

Sexual Harassment 

Sexual harassment is prohibited under the University's Title IX Sexual Harassment Policy as well as the University's Policy Against Discrimination, Discriminatory Harassment, and Retaliation.

Title IX Sexual Harassment Definition:

Conduct on the basis of sex that satisfies one or more of the following conditions:

  1. An employee of the University conditioning the provision of an aid, benefit, or service of the University on an individual’s participation in unwelcome sexual conduct; or,
  2. Unwelcome conduct determined by a reasonable person to be so severe, pervasive, and objectively offensive that it effectively denies a person equal access to the University’s education program or activity.

Policy Against Discrimination, Discriminatory Harassment, and Retaliation Definition:

Unwelcome verbal and/or physical conduct based on a person's sex constitutes hostile environment harassment when:

  • it is sufficiently severe or pervasive that it alters the conditions of education or employment and creates an environment that a reasonable person would find intimidating or hostile; OR
  • submission to such conduct is made either explicitly or implicitly a term or condition of an individual’s employment or education; OR
  • submission to, or rejection of, such conduct by an individual is used as a basis for academic or employment decisions affecting that individual.

Sexual Exploitation

Sexual exploitation is a form of sexual harassment and is taking sexual advantage of another person for one’s own benefit or the benefit of anyone other than that person without that person’s consent.

Examples of behavior that could rise to the level of sexual exploitation include, but are not limited to:

  • prostituting another person;
  • recording images (e.g., video, photograph) or audio of another person’s sexual activity, intimate body parts, or nakedness without that person’s consent;
  • distributing through social media, texting, email or other media images (e.g., video, photograph) or audio of another person’s sexual activity, intimate body parts, or nakedness, if the individual distributing the images or audio knows or should have known that the person depicted in the images or audio did not consent to such disclosure and objects to such disclosure; and
  • viewing another person’s sexual activity, intimate body parts, or nakedness in a place where that person would have a reasonable expectation of privacy, without that person’s consent.

Sexual harassment, and therefore sexual exploitation, is prohibited by the University's Title IX Sexual Harassment Policy and the Policy Against Discrimination, Discriminatory Harassment, and Retaliation.  The specific conditions of the alleged behavior would determine which policy(ies) have jurisdiction.

Stalking 

Engaging in a course of conduct directed (directly, indirectly, through a third party or other means) at a specific person that would cause a reasonable person to— (A) fear for their safety or the safety of others; or (B) suffer substantial emotional distress. For the purposes of this Policy, the behaviors must be directly related to that person’s sex.

Stalking may occur in a range of formats including, but not limited to, in-person conduct, writings, texting, voicemail, email, social media, following someone with a global position system (GPS), and video/audio recording.

Examples of stalking behaviors could include, but are not limited to:

  • repeated unwanted or unsolicited contact or leaving unwanted gifts or items;
  • posting disturbing messages or threats online;
  • creating, attempting to create, or disseminating unauthorized recordings of another;
  • gathering information about an individual from family, friends, co-workers, and/or classmates, or by electronic means by installing spy-ware on a computer or using GPS;
  • threats in any form about an individual or their loved ones or threats to harm oneself;
  • damaging, stealing, borrowing, or relocating property, trespassing and vandalism;
  • pursuing, waiting, or showing up uninvited at a workplace, residence, classroom, or other locations frequented by an individual; and
  • directing a third party to take any of the above acts.

Policies

The University has outlined its policies and procedures regarding sexual assault, sexual harassment, gender-based harassment, domestic and dating violence, and stalking in the Equal Opportunity, Diversity and Affirmative Action Plan.  This document was developed and is shared by the nine State Universities.  

Equal Opportunity, Diversity and Affirmative Action Plan

Title IX Sexual Harassment Policy (including Complaint and Resolution Procedures): Appendix 7

Policy Against Discrimination, Discriminatory Harassment, and Retaliation, Section V, pg 9

Complaint Investigation and Resolution Procedure: Appendix 4, pg 58

Complaint Form: pg 69

Student Code of Conduct

The Student Code of Conduct establishes the rules and regulations all students of Framingham State University are expected to follow. They are made in any exercise of the powers that are an inherent corollary of the University's duty to protect its educational purposes by setting and distributing standards of student conduct and scholarship, and by regulating the use of University facilities. Students have a right to expect enforcement of these rules and regulations. The University also has the right to expect students to abide by these regulations in a manner that benefits the responsibilities given to students as members of the University community. Knowledge of these rules and regulations can prove most beneficial to students in utilizing and protecting their rights. 

Policy Regarding Domestic Violence Leave

"An Act Relative to Domestic Violence" provides employees with up to 15 days of leave annually if the employee, or a covered family member of the employee, is a victim of abusive behavior.  In response, the University developed the Policy Regarding Domestic Violence Leave that provides more detailed information about employees’ entitlement to this leave. 

Reporting Options

All members of the FSU community are encouraged to promptly report complaints, concerns, observations, knowledge, or suspicion of sexual harassment, sexual assault, domestic/dating violence, and stalking.  

Reporting these occurrences allows the University to take prompt and effective action to identify and address threats to our community and to provide assistance to those who may need it.

Many University employees are obligated to report (share knowledge or suspicion of) these incidents with the University Title IX Coordinator or the Title IX Coordinator for Students, with the exception of the FSU Designated Confidential Resource Person as well as certain medical professionals and clergy acting within their professional capacities. 

Note that the University’s responsibility is to ensure the safety of all students and employees on campus.  Therefore, and with limited exceptions, the University cannot guarantee that confidentiality can be maintained if such confidentiality would create a, imminent threat to the safety of others.  The University will take steps to keep information as private as possible, but cannot guarantee confidentiality.  Students seeking confidentiality may speak with FSU Designated Confidential Resource Person, or with medical professionals or clergy acting within their professional capacities, as noted below.

The University prohibits and takes proactive steps to prevent retaliation, adverse action against an individual, because the individual has made an honestly believed report or participated in an investigation, proceeding or hearing regarding a report or complaint of sexual harassment, sexual assault, domestic violence, dating violence, or stalking.

Title IX Coordinators

University Title IX Coordinator

Kim R. Dexter
Assistant Vice President of Human Resources and Equal Opportunity
Dwight Hall, 207/324
508-215-5859
titleix [at] framingham.edu

Title IX Coordinator for Students

Dr. Meg Nowak Borrego
Dean of Students
McCarthy Center, suite 504
508-626-4596
titleixstudent [at] framingham.edu 

Title IX Coordinator for Athletics  

Carey Eggen 
Deputy Director of Athletics and Senior Woman Administrator
Athletic Center, Second Floor 
508-626-4565
titleixathletics [at] framingham.edu

Deputy Title IX Coordinator

Jay Hurtubise
Assistant Dean of Students/ Deputy Title IX Coordinator for Students
McCarthy Center, suite 504
508-626-4596
jhurtubise [at] framingham.edu

Jesse Edwards
Associate Director of Equal Opportunity/ Deputy Title IX Coordinator for Employees
Dwight Hall, suite 207
508-626-4052
jedwards6 [at] framingham.edu

Community Standards

The Office of Community Standards can provide information on filing formal complaints where there are alleged violations of the Student Conduct Code, including the Title IX Sexual Harassment Policy or the Policy Against Discrimination, Discriminatory Harassment, and Retaliation. 

communitystandards [at] framingham.edu (communitystandards[at]framingham[dot]edu)

Law Enforcement

University Police

McCarthy Center, ground floor
508-626-4911

Confidential Reporting

FSU Designated Confidential Resource Person

McCarthy Center, Suite 504
508-626-4596
tixconfidential [at] framingham.edu

Voices Against Violence - designated counselor
 

Hotline 800-593-1125 (on-campus meetings available)

FSU Tip Line

The FSU Tip Line is also available for confidential reporting, however the University will likely be severely limited in investigating and responding to anonymous reports of sexual harassment, sexual violence, relationship violence, and stalking.

To provide anonymous information to FSU Police, send a text message to 67283 containing the word “FSUTIP,” followed by a space, and then your message.

How It Works: Two-way communication. Users submit their tips via text message. Campus Police are immediately notified of the tip. University Police may respond to user with follow up questions or information anonymously. Users receive confirmation messages for all submitted tips. FSU Tip offers tipsters anonymity, allowing anyone to discretely provide timely, critical information without letting those in his/her vicinity in on the communication.

Anonymous Reporting

Limited actions and interventions are available in response to anonymous reports.  In some cases, the university will be able to use information from anonymous reports to follow up with impacted parties or address problematic behavior directly.  However, information received anonymously will be used primarily for data and trend tracking. Anonymous reports may be made online using the ANONYMOUS REPORT FORM FOR INCIDENTS OF SEXUAL HARASSMENT, SEXUAL ASSAULT, DOMESTIC/DATING VIOLENCE, AND STALKING

Staff with Confidential Privilege

Professional staff and clergy in the following offices are entitled to confidential privilege with their clients when acting within their professional capacities.  Under the Clery Act, staff may still need to make a report that an offense has occurred but may omit information which may identify the individual.  

Counseling Center

508-626-4640

Health Center

508-626-4900

Campus Ministry

508-626-4610

Employee Duty to Report
 

The University recognizes that a person may feel most comfortable disclosing an incident to a University employee that one knows well. However, it is important to know when that information may be shared.

In terms of reports of discrimination, discriminatory harassment (including sex and gender based harassment), or retaliation, any trustee, administrator, department chair, program coordinator, manager or supervisor who has knowledge of or receives such a report from a student or other member of the University community is obligated to report the information to the EO Officer or Title IX Coordinator as soon as the employee becomes aware of it. Likewise, any member of the campus community is encouraged to report to the EO Officer or the Title IX Coordinator any conduct of which they have direct knowledge and which they in good faith believe constitutes discrimination, discriminatory harassment, or retaliation.

Other employees, for example resident assistants and athletics staff, must follow specific departmental protocols to report information that they receive or observe about discrimination, discriminatory harassment (including sex and gender based harassment), or retaliation.  Even where an employee of the University does not have the duty to report as outlined above, those employees are not considered confidential and may still share information that they learn. Only those resources designated as confidential can promise confidentiality.

Any member of the University community who has a question about their reporting responsibilities should contact the Title IX Coordinator or EO Officer.

Outside Agencies

At any time, individuals have the right to file charges of unlawful discrimination with the appropriate government agency with or without first utilizing the Title IX Complaint Procedures.  Such agencies include:

Office for Civil Rights
Boston Office
U.S. Department of Education
5 Post Office Square, 8th Floor
Boston, MA  02109-3921
Phone: 617-289-0111
Fax: (617) 289-0150
Email: OCR.Boston [at] ed.gov (OCR[dot]Boston[at]ed[dot]gov)
Timeframe:  Must file within 180 calendar days of alleged incident.

U.S. Equal Employment Opportunity Commission
John F. Kennedy Federal Building, Room. 475
Government Center
Boston, MA  02203-0506
617-565-3200
TTY: 617-565-3204
Timeframe: Must file within 300 calendar days of alleged incident.

Massachusetts Commission Against Discrimination
One Ashburton Place, Room. 601
Boston, MA  02108
617-727-3990 (x588 for TTY)
Timeframe: Must file within 300 calendar days of alleged incident.

Massachusetts Commission Against Discrimination
436 Dwight Street
Second Floor, Room 220
Springfield, MA  01103
(413) 739-2145
Timeframe: Must file within 300 calendar days of alleged incident.

Resources

We have compiled a list of support resources available to members of the Framingham State community and have organized them so that you can quickly and easily identify those resources that may be most helpful to you.

General Information about Sexual Assault
On Campus Resources
Local and Remote Resources
Resources for Employees
Risk Reduction

If you engage in abusive behavior or use violence in your relationship(s), the Massachusetts Department of Public Health offers Intimate Partner Abuse Education Program Services.