University Academic Policies

Absence Because of Religious Beliefs

Academic Course Work Off-Campus

Academic Fresh Start Policy

Academic Honesty

Advanced Placement (AP)

Attendance Policy

CAPS Program (College Academic Program Sharing)

Classroom Conduct Policy

College Level Examination Program (CLEP)

Course Add/Drop and Course Withdrawal ('W')

Course Credit/No Credit Policy - New policy in effect starting Fall 2022

Course Descriptions

Course Levels

Course Prerequisites

Course Registration - Undergraduate - New policy in effect starting Fall 2022

Course Repeat Policy -Undergraduate Programs - New policy in effect starting Fall 2022

Dean's and President's Lists Eligibility (Semester-based) - New policy in effect starting Fall 2022

Directed Study

General Education Requirements

Grade Appeal Policy - New policy in effect starting Fall 2022

Grade Point Average

Grade System

Graduation Participation

Graduation Rate Information

Incomplete Grade Policy

Independent Study

Internship and Practicum

Math Placement Re-Testing

Payment of University Charges

Required Declaration of Major

Semester Course Load

Senior Citizen Status

Student Biographical Information

Transfer Credit Policies

Veterans Information

Voter Registration


Absence Because of Religious Beliefs:

"Any student in an educational or vocational training institution, other than a religious or denominational educational or vocational training institution, who is unable, because of his religious beliefs, to attend classes or to participate in any examination, study or work requirement on a particular day, shall be excused from any such examination or study or work requirement, and shall be provided with an opportunity to make up such examination, study or work requirement which he may have missed because of such absence on any particular day; provided, however, that such makeup examination or work shall not create an unreasonable burden upon such school. No fees of any kind shall be charged by the institution for making available to the said student such opportunity. No adverse or prejudicial effects shall result to any student because of his availing himself of the provisions of this section."
(Massachusetts General Laws, Chapter 151C, Section 2B).

Academic Course Work Off-Campus:

To receive credit for courses taken at other institutions, matriculated students must obtain approval in advance from appropriate department chairs. Retroactive approval will not be given.

Off-campus course approval forms may be downloaded or are available in the Office of the University Registrar. Applications for approval of a course should be accompanied by the appropriate catalog description from that institution. After obtaining the appropriate signatures for approval of the course, the student must return the completed form to the Office of the University Registrar. The form will then be reviewed for course credit transferability.

Transcripts of these approved courses must be submitted to the Office of the University Registrar within six (6) weeks after the completion of the course. It is the student's responsibility to have official transcripts sent directly by the institution to the Office of the University Registrar.

All approved courses transferred into Framingham State University after matriculation will be awarded Framingham course credit in an amount equal to the cumulative total number of semester hour credits transferred divided by 4 and rounded to the nearest whole number. For example, if students take three 3-credit courses, they will be awarded two (2) Framingham State University course credits.

Transfer credit is given only for courses in which the student received a grade of C- or better. Courses must extend for at least a three-week period and meet a minimum of forty-five hours. Although credit is awarded for all approved transfer courses, the grades will not be recorded on the student’s Framingham State University transcripts nor be counted in computing the quality point average.

Students may inquire further when seeking approval of courses to be taken at other institutions, and they will be notified of the total number of course credits they have earned from such courses whenever additional approved courses are transferred.


Academic Fresh Start Policy:

Any student who has separated from Framingham State University due to voluntary withdrawal in good standing with an overall grade point average at or above 1.70 and less than 2.00, or due to academic suspension/dismissal and had an overall grade point average below 2.00 at the time of separation is eligible to apply for readmission under the Fresh Start policy under certain conditions:

  • The period of separation from the University must be at least two (2) consecutive semesters.
  • The student supplies evidence of personal growth during the period of separation, in the form of two letters of recommendation.

The University offers 36 majors currently, several of which may not have been available when you last attended. We invite to browse through the current undergraduate programs as you consider returning to Framingham State to complete your bachelor's degree.

Applicants to Fresh Start will be reviewed by the Academic Standing Committee (ASC). Applications will be due August 1st for Fall semester and December 1st for Spring semester.  When a student is accepted under the Fresh Start Policy, the previous Grade Point Average (GPA) will be cleared. Only courses taken after Fresh Start readmission will count toward the GPA. Previous courses in which a grade of C- (1.7) or better was earned will count as transfer credit toward graduation requirements but will not factor into the student’s GPA. Under the Fresh Start policy, students must complete at least eight (8) FSU courses, five (5) in the major, with an overall GPA of 2.00 in order to receive an undergraduate degree from FSU. The Fresh Start policy may be exercised only once. Once a student exercises the Fresh Start, it may not be rescinded. The student’s academic transcript will note the readmission status as Academic Fresh Start along with the semester the status commenced.


Academic Honesty Policy:

Integrity is essential to academic life. Consequently, students who enroll at Framingham State University agree to maintain high standards of academic honesty and scholarly practice. They shall be responsible for familiarizing themselves with the published university policies and procedures regarding academic honesty. Faculty members are required to reference the university policy on academic honesty in their syllabi, and they shall, at their discretion, include in their course syllabi additional statements on definitions of academic honesty and academic honesty policies specific to their courses if applicable.

Infractions of the Policy on Academic Honesty include, but are not limited to:
  1. Plagiarism: claiming as one’s own work the published or unpublished literal or paraphrased work of another;
  2. Cheating on exams, tests, quizzes, assignments, and papers, including the distribution or acceptance of these materials and other sources of information without the permission of the instructor(s);
  3. Unauthorized collaboration with other individuals in the preparation of course assignments;
  4. Submitting without authorization the same assignment for credit in more than one course;
  5. Use of dishonest procedures in computer, laboratory, studio, or field work;
  6. Misuse of the University’s technical and educational facilities either maliciously or for personal gain;
  7. Falsification of forms used to document the academic record and to conduct the academic business of the University.
  8. The enlistment of another individual or entity to complete one’s course work.
Procedures for Handling Cases of Alleged Infractions of Academic Honesty
When a course instructor suspects a student of academic dishonesty, they notify the student in writing of the alleged infraction as soon as possible after the discovery of the infraction. After an infraction, the course instructor administers appropriate penalties that range from resubmission of the work in question to failing the course, as determined by the course instructor. The student will have five business days to respond to the allegation in writing through email or the appropriate form. If the student does not dispute the allegation or the student does not respond to the charges within five business days, the course instructor reports the infraction to academichonesty@framingham.edu , using the appropriate form, serving as notice to the Office of Academic Affairs, Academic Deans, and the Academic Policies Committee (APC) Chair. This notification must take place within ten business days of the discovery of the infraction and should include any corroborating evidence.
If a student disputes the allegation of academic dishonesty, the alleged infraction will be heard by a subcommittee of APC in executive session. This subcommittee will be comprised of the APC Chair, up to three APC faculty members and up to two students recommended under the auspices of the Student Government Association.  All members must be disinterested parties with allowances being made for members to recuse themselves if a conflict of interest is identified by any of the parties. The resulting subcommittee will always be composed of an odd number of voting members. The APC Chair’s role is to facilitate the meeting, and is not considered a voting member.  A decision will be rendered based on a majority vote. The subcommittee will review the case within ten business days of receipt.  The student, course instructor, and any relevant University personnel will be invited to the subcommittee hearing by the APC Chair, although attendance of those invited is not mandatory. The APC Chair will distribute any documentation and evidence received regarding the alleged infraction to the student and subcommittee prior to the hearing. The subcommittee will base their decision solely on any evidence or testimony presented during the hearing.
The student may have a support person accompany them to any scheduled APC Academic Honesty sub-committee meeting(s). A support person may not address any person involved in the hearing except for the student they are supporting; a support person who does not comply with these requirements may be dismissed by the presiding administrator.
The standard of review used to evaluate the alleged academic infraction is preponderance of evidence, which is “more likely than not”. Within five business days after the meeting, the APC Chair will notify the student, the faculty member, and the Academic Dean of the subcommittee’s decision, which is final.
• If the student’s appeal is successful, the faculty member will update the grade in question within ten business days;
Else
• If the student’s appeal is unsuccessful, the APC Chair reports the infraction to the Academic Dean and the Office of Academic Affairs for record-keeping purposes in writing within five business days.
All records of academic honesty policy violations will be maintained by the Office of Academic Affairs. Faculty are expected to report all incidents of academic honesty infractions.
In the case of multiple infractions:
  • Upon notification to an Academic Dean of a violation, the Academic Dean will determine if the student has previous infractions.
  • After a student’s second infraction at the University, the Academic Dean will notify the student that they must meet with the Academic Dean.
  • After a student’s third infraction at the University, the student shall be notified of permanent dismissal from the University by the Office of Academic Affairs. This penalty of dismissal can be appealed. Such an appeal must be made in writing to the University Provost/Vice President for Academic Affairs within five (5) business days of notification of the penalty.
    In the case that APC is not in session - June 1st thru August 31st - at the time of the alleged infraction, the Academic Dean will report the alleged infraction to the Provost. The Provost will appoint a subcommittee consisting of an odd number of faculty, administration, and students, as appropriate. The Provost, or their designee, will be the non-voting facilitator of the hearing. The hearing and timeline will otherwise proceed as specified above.

Advanced Placement (AP) Policy:

Advanced Placement (AP) credit towards graduation will be awarded to candidates who obtain scores of three (3) or higher on the College Entrance Examination Board Advanced Placement Tests. Official score results must be forwarded directly to the Office of Undergraduate Admissions. Please click here for the FSU AP Equivalencies.


Attendance Policy:

Classroom instruction is a principal component of the educational process. Students and faculty have a mutual responsibility for contributing to the academic environment of the classroom. Consistent class attendance and participation in classroom activities are essential. It is expected that students will attend classes. Students should consult the course outline or syllabus to determine the relationships between attendance, including tardiness, and the goals, objectives, requirements, and grading of each course.


CAPS Program:

College Academic Program Sharing (CAPS) is a program for the sharing of academic facilities by the students attending Massachusetts State Universities (does not apply to the University of Massachusetts system or Community Colleges). Participating colleges include Bridgewater State University, Fitchburg State University, Framingham State University, Massachusetts College of Art, Massachusetts College of Liberal Arts, Salem State University, Westfield State University, and Worcester State University.

The primary purpose of the this program is to offer the opportunity to students registered at one state university to take up to thirty (30) semester hours of college credit at another state university without going through the formal registration procedures. Interested students must file a request form by June 1st for the fall semester and by December 30th for the spring semester. NOTE: Priority seating availability is given to matriculated students at the host institution.


Classroom Conduct Policy:

Preamble
Framingham State University supports the principles of freedom of expression for both faculty and students. In order to maintain these principles, all students and course instructors are entitled to a safe, positive, and constructive teaching and learning environment. Disruptive or dangerous behaviors in classrooms and other academic settings can disturb teaching and learning, and these behaviors will not be tolerated. Any individual who engages in disruptive or dangerous behaviors in classrooms may be subject to disciplinary action in accordance with the Classroom Conduct Policy found in the University undergraduate catalog.

Consistent with the principles described in the FSU Student Code of Conduct:

“The University has the power and responsibility to take proper disciplinary action against students whose behavior threatens or disrupts the mission of the University. This is the general principle governing the jurisdiction of the disciplinary authorities of the University. It means that the disciplinary powers of the University extend to behavior that disrupts the educational process and other activities that are recognized as the lawful mission of the University. It also means that it extends to behavior that violates the peace and order of the University in such a manner that members of the University cannot go about their proper business secure in their persons and property.”

This policy applies to all learning environments and modalities including the traditional classroom, online courses, laboratory settings, practicum and internship assignments and University sponsored off-campus learning activities (“field trips”).

Examples of disruptive or dangerous language and/or behavior, consistent with those noted in the Student Code of Conduct, are listed below and may be addressed and restricted to the extent that the behavior interferes with the teaching and learning process. This is not an exhaustive list. Faculty are encouraged to include language about expectations for classroom conduct in their syllabi and may choose to use these examples at their discretion.

• The use of derogatory, vulgar, and insulting language directed at an individual or group.
• Unsolicited, disruptive talking, noises, or behaviors in class, such as crosstalk or carrying on side conversations.
• Engagement in unyielding argument or debate. Frequent interruptions of the course instructor or students.
• Making rude, disrespectful, or inappropriate comments in class.
• Disruptive or distracting use of mobile technology or laptops that is not related to a classroom or academic activity
• The failure to comply with a reasonable request made by a course instructor.

Examples of Disruptive Behaviors Associated with online/hybrid classes – consistent with the University’s Acceptable Use Policy

• Posting rude, disrespectful, offensive, or inappropriate comments, photos, or videos on discussion boards.
• Unauthorized sharing of information posted in a course discussion board
• Intentionally posting links to websites that are not relevant or helpful to the course materials.
• Any violation of the University’s Acceptable Use Policy.

Examples of Dangerous Behavior

• Violations of the FSU Student Code of Conduct that occur in the classroom or learning environment.
• Directly communicated threats of imminent harm.
• Self-injurious behavior during class.
• Physical assault that is threatened or in progress during class.
• Throwing objects or slamming doors during class.

For Dangerous Behavior, faculty should contact University Police. After notification of University Police, the faculty member should notify the department chair and academic dean and then follow the procedures outlined above for disruptive behavior.

Progressive Approach to Handling Disruptive Behaviors

A progressive approach to handling disruptive behavior gives the student the opportunity to modify their behavior. It also gives the student time to seek out appropriate assistance from the Center for Academic Success and Achievement, the Office of the Dean of Students, or the Counseling Center if applicable.

For Disruptive Behavior, course instructors should pursue the following steps:

For the first reported incident:
1. The faculty member reports the incident of disruptive behavior in their class to the department chair, using the Disruptive Classroom Behavior Reporting Form.
2. This form will be filed in the Office of Academic Affairs.
3. The faculty member, department chair, and academic dean should communicate regarding the incident within 24 hours and prior to the next class period whenever possible.
4. Next steps are identified through collaboration among the faculty member, department chair, and academic dean prior to the next class period whenever possible. Depending on the severity of disruption, intervention options, which may be used separately or in combination, include the following:

a) The department chair follows up with the student and discusses resources available for support. The faculty member has the option to attend this meeting.
b) If advised by the chair or dean, depending on the severity of the incident, the faculty member submits a report to the Student Assistance Team (SAT).
c) The faculty member contacts the Office of Community Standards to file a complaint or to consult and receive assistance.
d) The faculty member contacts the Title IX Coordinator for students if the case involves allegations of discrimination, discriminatory harassment, sexual harassment, and/or gender-based harassment.
e) The academic dean notifies the Provost as needed.

For any Subsequent Event in the Same Class:
1. The faculty member reports a second or subsequent occurrence with this student on the Disruptive Behavior Reporting Form. The form should be forwarded to the chair and the academic dean within 24 hours of the incident. This form will be filed in the Office of Academic Affairs.
2. The student may be asked not to return to class until the involved parties have a chance to consult.
3. Prior to the next class meeting, the academic dean will contact the faculty member and the department chair to obtain additional information and consult. The academic dean will communicate with all parties involved through the duration of the removal from class (if the incident is not resolved prior to the next class meeting). A determination should be made within three business days.
4. After the consultation, the academic dean will consult with the Dean of Students and other parties as appropriate and may pursue formal academic disciplinary action.
5. If formal academic disciplinary action is warranted, the academic dean will contact the student in order to address any allegations.
6. The academic dean will follow up with the faculty member and department chair to communicate next steps or final outcomes.
7. Once a decision has been made, the academic dean will inform appropriate parties of outcome if necessary and appropriate (e.g. Office of Financial Aid, Office of Student Accounts, Dean of Students, Registrar, University Police).
8. The student may appeal any formal academic disciplinary action to the Dean of Students and Provost/Vice-President for Academic Affairs.

Appeal of Formal Academic Disciplinary Action

The student has five business days to submit a written appeal of the formal academic disciplinary action to the review board, which consists of the Dean of Students and the Provost/Vice-President for Academic Affairs. The grounds for the appeal are limited to:

• A claim of a procedural error within the investigation and resolution process that would substantially change the outcome; or
• A consideration of new evidence that was not known at the time of the investigation that would substantially change the outcome.

All appeal decisions are final.


College Level Examination Program (CLEP):

The College Level Examination Program (CLEP) is open to both incoming and enrolled students under the following conditions:

  1. Incoming first term freshmen may register for either the general battery exams (English Composition, Humanities, Mathematics, Natural Science and Social Sciences-History) or subject matter exams.
  2. Transfer and enrolled students may register for any general exam, provided they have not earned, or are not in the process of earning credit in a specific discipline covered by the general exam in question. Such students may also register for subject matter exams, provided they have not earned, or are not in the process of earning credit in a course which covers an equivalent area of study.
  3. Students attempting to "earn" credit via CLEP exams must achieve a score greater than 50 (effective Summer 2001).  Scores achieved less than 50 will not be acceptable for transfer credit.  (Prior to Summer 2001 - a score in the 50th percentile or higher must have been earned.)


Course Credit/No Credit Option Policy:

Effective beginning Fall 2022

The primary purpose of the Credit/No Credit Option is to afford students an opportunity to explore course work in areas outside of their regular degree requirements without the direct application of the normal letter grade scale to their grade point average (GPA). A course selected under the provisions of the Credit/No Credit Option, as outlined below, is assigned a grade of Credit (Cr) if the student earns a final grade of D- or above. The student is assigned a No Credit (NC) if the student earns a final grade below D-.
Matriculated undergraduate students are permitted to take up to four (4) courses on a Credit/No Credit basis during their entire degree program, subject to the following conditions:
1. Only one (1) course may be taken on a Credit/No Credit basis during enrollment in any fall, wintersession, spring, or summer term (in addition to those courses which are graded Credit/No Credit for all students in that course);
2. Excluded as Credit/No Credit Option courses are those in the following categories:
a. Courses in the student’s academic major/concentration, including major-related, or in a minor. Once all major/concentration or minor requirements have been met, students may elect to take a course within the major department on a Credit/No Credit basis;
b. Prerequisite courses in which a minimum grade is required for advancing into a requisite course that is required for major/concentration or minor requirements;
3. Time frame for requesting the Credit/No Credit Option:
a. A student must declare whether a course is Credit/No Credit by the last day of the course withdrawal period of the term. The student requesting to take a course on a Credit/No Credit basis will be notified by the Office of the University Registrar within one (1) business day regarding eligibility;
b. A student who initially selects the Credit/No Credit Option may switch to the graded option on or before the final day for course withdrawal. The request to do so must be submitted in writing to the Office of the University Registrar;
4. If the student changes or declares a major or minor that requires a course or courses previously taken on a Credit/No Credit basis, the student’s records will be amended by the Office of the University Registrar to convert the Credit/No Credit to the actual grade submitted by the course instructor(s);
5. The instructor of the course is not informed that the student has filed a Credit/No Credit Option for the course. When the instructor submits a letter grade for the student, the Office of the University Registrar will convert it to a Credit (CR) or No Credit (NC) grade.
6. A Credit grade grants the student course credit but does not count in computing the student’s GPA. A No Credit grade has no impact on the student’s GPA.

Please note that courses taken as Pass/Fail during Spring 2020 as a result of the COVID-19 Course Pass/Fail Policy are not considered part of the four courses a student can take as Pass/Fail during their career at the University.


Course Descriptions:

In the University catalog, under each course number and title, is a brief description of its content, followed by a statement on prerequisites, if any, explaining the requirements for admission to the course. Courses appropriate for general education are identified by (GenEd Goal), following the course title.


Course Levels:

The numbers to the right of the decimal point indicate the course level:

  • 000-099 Non-credit courses.
  • 100-199 Courses that are introductory in nature, assuming no prior college-level exposure to the discipline.
  • 200-299 Courses appropriate for students with prior exposure to the college regimen or to the discipline, some with prerequisites.
  • 300-399 Upper-level courses that build on previous exposure to the discipline, most with prerequisites.
  • 400-499 Senior-level courses, most with prerequisites, including independent studies, internships, seminars, directed studies, and practicum.
  • 600-699 Courses for public service undergraduate credit (not for degree programs - Exceptions may be made by the Major Department Chair).
  • 700(00)-799(99) Courses for public service and professional development graduate credit (not for degree programs).
  • 800-899 Courses for graduate program credit but taught as duel level with the appropriate undergraduate course number assigned. For students enrolled in Master’s or Post Baccalaureate Teacher Certification programs only. Undergraduate students cannot enroll in graduate level courses.
  • 900-999 Courses assigned as graduate level courses. For students enrolled in Master’s or Post Baccalaureate Teacher Certification programs only. Undergraduate students cannot enroll in graduate level courses.


Course Prerequisites:

It is the student’s responsibility to be aware of and have met prerequisites prior to attempting any course. Course prerequisites may be found in the University catalog as part of the course description.


Course Registration - Undergraduate:

The course registration period for an upcoming fall or spring term begins approximately mid-semester of the current term. Students receive information for advising and registration from the Academic Advising Center and the Office of the University Registrar. Students are required to meet with their Academic Advisors to plan their upcoming course selections. After consulting with their advisors, students then register for the upcoming fall or spring term based on priority of registration and registration grouping.

Priority of Registration: Students in Commonwealth Honors Program are permitted to register first in their registration grouping followed by eligible varsity student-athletes, when registering for courses that coincide with their competitive seasons.
REGISTRATION GROUPING FOR FALL OR SPRING SEMESTER:

To ensure reasonable opportunity for course planning at registration, the registration groupings are based on the following:

  • Group 1 – Expected Completion of 22 or more course-credits.
  • Group 2 – Expected Completion of 14-21 course-credits.
  • Group 3 – Expected Completion of 6-13 course-credits.
  • Group 4 – Expected Completion of fewer than 6 course-credits.

(Expected Completion refers to the combination of previously completed courses, if any, including transfer coursework, along with currently enrolled courses).


Course Repeat Policy - Undergraduate Programs:

Effective beginning Fall 2022

Effective Fall 2022, the University has established the following policy for undergraduate students regarding the repeating of courses.

• You may repeat courses taken at the university, regardless of the original grade earned in these courses

• If you choose to repeat a course, both grades for the course will be posted on your academic transcript but only the higher grade will be counted toward your grade point average (GPA). The repeated course will be noted on your transcript as an “excluded repeat”.

• Only Framingham State University grades are used to calculate your GPA.

• If you retake a course at FSU that has already transferred in, the transfer course will be removed.

• You may take an equivalent course from another institution to replace a course previously taken at FSU.  The FSU course grade will not be calculated in your overall GPA, and the transfer credit will replace the course taken at FSU.

• The course repeated must be equivalent to the first course taken. In the event that the course no longer exists at FSU, an exception may be considered.

• You may not repeat a course after graduation as your academic transcript is finalized upon degree conferral.

Exceptions:

• Certain courses, such as Special Topics courses, among others, are designated as “repeatable for credit”.  A grade earned in such a course cannot be replaced by a grade from a later retake of the course.  This means that each grade will count toward your GPA, and each time you complete such a course you will earn credits.

• RAMS First-Year Seminars are defined as “the same course,” despite distinct course numbers and being offered by multiple departments. If you repeat a RAMS First-Year Seminar, you will receive credit for the course with the higher grade and, therefore, fulfill the General Education subdomain affiliated with that course.

Please note:

• The highest grade for the repeated course is used for your GPA, but all grades appear on your academic transcript.

• Repeating a previously passed course may affect your financial aid.  You should consult with the Office of Financial Aid if you are considering repeating a course that you have previously passed.

• If you return to FSU for a second bachelor’s degree, you may not repeat any courses that were part of your first undergraduate degree.



Dean's and President's Lists Eligibility (Fall and Spring semesters only):

Effective beginning Fall 2022

Dean’s List
A matriculated undergraduate student earns a place on this honor roll (published after the end of every fall and spring semester) for each fall and spring semester in which the student earns a GPA of 3.30 to 3.74.

President’s List
A matriculated undergraduate student earns a place on this honor roll (published after the end of every fall and spring semester) for each fall and spring semester in which the student earns a GPA of 3.75 to 4.00.

Additional Eligibility Limitations
A student obtaining either an “IC” grade or an extension for an “N” grade is not initially eligible for the Dean’s/President’s List but may petition in writing to the Office of the University Registrar to have their eligibility for the Dean’s/President’s List reviewed once the final grade has been submitted. Petitions must occur by the end of the semester that the grade was submitted.



Directed Study:

Students who wish to take a regular university course in a term when it is not offered may seek to do so through a Directed Study option. However, students must understand that, because the appropriate FSU faculty must be available and approvals must be granted, the option of Directed Study for a particular course is not always available. In Directed Study, the FSU faculty member must agree to provide the student with close supervision, in achieving the same course objectives that would have been accomplished had the student taken the course on a regular class basis. Permission for Directed Study must be obtained from the subject/course faculty supervisor and the course department chair. Forms for enrolling in Directed Study are available at the Office of the University Registrar. The completed forms must be submitted to the Office of the University Registrar prior to the end of the Course Add/Drop at the start of the semester. Directed Study courses will appear on the student’s course history with the actual course prefix, number, and title as found in the Catalog.


General Education Requirements:

Students will meet the General Education Requirements as stated in the University catalog during the year they entered the University. Those students who matriculated prior to the Fall 1997 semester will follow the "Group" general education (Gen.Ed.) requirements while those students matriculating into the University for the Fall 1997 to Fall 2012 semester will be required to follow the "Goal" Gen.Ed. requirements. Students matriculating Fall 2013 and later will be required to follow the "Domain" General Education model.

The general education requirement is intended to provide breadth in the baccalaureate degree program to foster student learning beyond a single, narrow discipline or field. General education is designed to facilitate the increase of knowledge, an appreciation for learning in a broad context, the ability to relate new information to what one has previously learned, the capacity to judge information rather than to simply accept it, and the facility to use what one learns in a realistic and logical manner. In addition, the general education requirement is designed to help students to acquire the ability:

  • To communicate (write, speak, and listen) clearly and effectively,
  • to think critically, quantitatively, and creatively, and
  • to locate and to process information


For more information on the Domain General Education requirements, view the current Undergraduate Catalog.


Grade Appeal Policy:

Effective beginning Fall 2022

Students have the right to discuss and review their academic performance with their instructors. Faculty have the right to establish grading standards. Faculty also have the responsibility to define general grading criteria in a course syllabus, communicate those criteria to students, and evaluate students based on those criteria.

Students may appeal final course grades (herein, grade) based on evidence of error, arbitrariness, and/or discrimination. Appeals must be based on concerns related to process and not on differences in judgment or opinion related to academic performance. The burden of proof rests on the student to demonstrate that the grade satisfies the criteria for appeal.
Error

The instructor made a mistake in calculating the grade.

Arbitrariness

An arbitrary grade is considered to be one that is:

• A substantial departure from reasonable academic practice, such as arbitrarily assigning grades or determining a priori that a specified percentage of the class will receive a specific grade. To fairly represent a student’s true achievement, it is understood that failing grades on assessments should receive their true percentile value.
• A grade assigned to a student on the basis of criteria that are a substantial, unreasonable, and unannounced departure from the instructor’s previously articulated standards.
• A grade resulting from an instructor adding items not listed on the syllabus, except for extra credit.
• Assigned to a student by resorting to unreasonable standards different from those which were applied to other students in that section of the course.
• Motivated by judgment outside of academic performance (e.g. ill will toward the student).

Discrimination

The University’s Equal Opportunity Plan (“EO Plan”) prohibits discrimination and harassment on the basis of membership in a protected class. A complaint may proceed under the Investigation and Resolution Procedures, the Title IX Informal Resolution Process, or the Title IX Formal Resolution Process outlined in the EO Plan when a student alleges that a grade was improper because of discrimination, discriminatory harassment, sexual or gender harassment, domestic or dating violence, stalking or retaliation prohibited under the EO Plan. For example, a professor making a quid pro quo arrangement or directing hate/bias speech toward students or protected classes would be some of the types of behaviors that would be indicative of a discrimination-based grade appeal.

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Grade Appeal Process
If a student is filing based on discrimination, prior to initiating the grade appeal, this complaint may be filed directly with the Equal Opportunity Officer “EO Officer” or University Title IX Coordinator. A student is never required to file a complaint under the EO Plan in order to initiate the Grade Appeal Process. See “EO Appeal Process” below.

For appeals based on error or arbitrariness:

Step One: Informal Appeal to the Instructor
If a student feels that they received a grade that is eligible for appeal, they should first contact the course instructor within four weeks of the official end of the semester or two weeks after the grades are posted, whichever is later. The student and instructor will have an informal discussion regarding the grade. If the issue is not resolved, the student moves on to Step Two.

If the course instructor is no longer teaching at the University or is otherwise unavailable, the student’s initial grade complaint should go to the department chair.

Step Two: Formal Appeal to the Instructor
Within two weeks of the informal appeal decision, the student submits a formal appeal to the course instructor along with supporting documentation outlining why the grade is being appealed. The student must provide evidence that the grade satisfies the criteria for appeal. The course instructor will inform the student of the results of a further consideration of the grade in writing within two weeks of receipt of the formal complaint.

Step Three: Appeal to the Department Chair
If, after hearing back from the instructor, the student still believes that the grade is eligible for appeal, the student should meet with the chair of the department in which the course was offered within two weeks after receipt of the appeal decision from the course instructor. The student will share the written appeal and documentation with the chair. The chair may meet also with the course instructor. The chair may not change the grade, but the course instructor may choose to do so after their discussion with the chair. The course instructor will notify the student and chair in writing within two weeks of their decision, after meeting with the chair.

Step Four: Appeal to the Academic Dean
If, after being informed of the course instructor's decision, the student still believes that the grade is eligible for appeal, the student may take up the matter with the academic dean of the college in which the course was offered (home department) within two weeks of receipt of the course instructor’s decision. The student will share the written appeal and documentation with the academic dean. After reviewing the student’s appeal and the course instructor’s response(s), the academic dean will discuss the matter with the student, the course instructor and/or the department chair. The academic dean may also invite the course instructor to submit a statement. The academic dean may also decide to hold a meeting at which both the student and course instructor may respond to the other's written statements and to any questions that the academic dean wishes to pose to them. If the academic dean determines that there is no merit to the appeal, the dean shall inform the student that the grade will stand. This ends the appeal process.

Step Five: Appeal to the Academic Policies Committee (APC)
If the academic dean determines that there may be merit to the appeal, they will refer the case to the Academic Policies Committee (APC). The Chair of APC will appoint a subcommittee consisting of three faculty members. No more than one member of this subcommittee shall be from the same department as the course instructor of the course in question. This hearing body will review the substance of the case and make recommendations regarding whether a grade change would be appropriate. The hearing body will have the authority, after a thorough review of all relevant assignments and related materials, to uphold the grade assigned by the instructor, to assign an appropriate grade, or to allow the student to accept a pass in the course rather than a letter grade. The decision of the subcommittee is final.

Note: In all meetings with the course instructor, department chair, or academic dean that are part of this appeals process, the student may bring a support person of their choice except for legal counsel.
For appeals based on discrimination:

If a student is filing based on discrimination, prior to initiating the grade appeal, this complaint may be filed directly with the Equal Opportunity Officer “EO Officer” or University Title IX Coordinator. A student is never required to file a complaint under the EO Plan in order to initiate the Grade Appeal Process. See “EO Appeal Process” below.

Note: If the department chair, academic dean, and/or the APC subcommittee is presented with allegations or otherwise determines that the grade appeal involves allegations of discrimination, discriminatory harassment, sexual or gender-based harassment, domestic or dating violence, stalking or retaliation as outlined in the University’s Equal Opportunity Plan (“EO Plan”), the deadline to file the formal appeal and other subsequent deadlines will be waived. These cases will be referred to the EO Officer or University Title IX Coordinator by the chair, dean, or the APC subcommittee before proceeding further. The remedy for policy violations in cases pursued under the procedures in the EO Plan may be determined and/or implemented in conjunction with Academic Affairs. If no violation of the EO Plan is found, or the student declines to file a complaint under the EO Plan, the EO Officer may refer the matter back to the grade appeal process.

EO Appeal Process: If the student elects to use the processes available under the EO Plan, the EO Officer or University Title IX Coordinator will implement the procedures as outlined in the EO Plan. The academic affairs Grade Appeal Process will be suspended pending review and determination under the EO Plan.  If no violation of the EO plan is found, the EO Officer may refer the matter back to the grade appeal process. In the event of a finding of a violation of the EO Plan, the EO Officer will remand the matter to the Provost (or their designee) who will designate an appropriate person to decide the outcome of the grade appeal.


Grade Point Average:

Only the undergraduate coursework taken post-matriculation at Framingham State University through the Day School or Continuing Education (including intersession and summer terms) will be used in determining the grade point average (GPA) of any student.

The number of grade points that a student receives in a course is determined by the letter grade (see section on Grading System for explanation of grade points). The grade point average is computed by dividing the total number of grade points by the total number of course-credits attempted at the University, by semester or overall total. The grade point average (GPA) for each semester and overall is presented in three digits, one before and two after the decimal point.

In the case of suspended/dismissed students, undergraduate coursework taken through Continuing Education will be evaluated for posting at the time of readmission to the University. Courses that are academically inappropriate for Day School programs are automatically inhibited and are not calculated in the GPA. Therefore, to receive credit for 600-level courses, students must obtain prior written approval from their major department chairs. Failure to do so will result in denial of course credit toward the degree, as 600-level courses are not automatically applied to the baccalaureate degree.

Students must have achieved a minimum final overall grade point average of 2.00 in order to graduate. Effective Fall 2007, completion of a baccalaureate degree at Framingham State University requires that all students achieve a minimum 2.00 grade point average in their major requirements, including major-related courses taken for fulfillment of major requirements as well as University residency requirements. Effective Fall 2018, completion of a minor requires that all students achieve a minimum 2.00 grade point average in their minor requirements as well as University residency requirements.


Grading System:

Framingham State University uses the following marking system:

Grade          Grade Points

A                 4.0

A-                3.7

B+               3.3

B                 3.0

B-                2.7

C+               2.3

C                 2.0

C-                1.7

D+               1.3

D                 1.0

D-                0.7

F                  0.0

AU =     (Audit-no credit) A student may audit courses with the consent of the instructor. Such course enrollment will be officially reported on the student’s transcript pending approval by the instructor, but the student will not receive any credit. An auditor may not participate actively in course work. A special approval form for this status must be obtained from the Office of the University Registrar and returned completed by the end of the fifth academic day.

CR/NC = (Credit/No Credit) A Credit grade grants the student course credit but does not count in computing the student’s GPA. A No Credit grade has no impact on the student’s GPA.

S/U =   (Satisfactory/Unsatisfactory) This grade is used only for student teaching experience.

W =     Withdrawal from a Course. Indicates withdrawal from a semester course in the third through the tenth week of the semester, or for a quarter course, no later than the end of the fourth full week of the quarter.

WN = Withdrawal for Non-Attendance. Indicates an administrative withdrawal from a course or the University if it has been determined the student is not in attending classes between the end of the drop period and prior to the end of the 13th week of the semester for the fall and spring semesters or no later than the end of the fifth week of a quarter semester course. Students do not receive grade points for Withdraw (WN) grades, but a notation appears on the transcript.

WX =  Withdrawal from the University after the Course Add/Drop period but before the end of the tenth week of the semester. The student has officially withdrawn from the University and no longer attends classes.

MG = Missing Grade. Final grade not yet submitted by the faculty.

NG =   Non-Graded course.

IR/IC = (Incomplete Requested/Incomplete Contract Submitted) This is a temporary grade designation that has no impact on the student’s grade point average.



Graduation Participation:

Beginning with the Spring 2011 Commencement Ceremony, all students must complete all degree requirements in order to participate in the Spring Commencement ceremony.
Appeals of this requirement with regards to participation in the Spring Commencement ceremony may be made only on one of the following bases:

1. The student has no more than one (1) course remaining to complete degree requirements, has a minimum grade point average of 2.00, and has a highly extenuating, documented circumstance that would support a hardship exception to the requirement.

OR

2. The student has no more than one (1) course remaining to complete degree requirements, has a minimum grade point average of 2.50, and can document that this coursework will likely be completed no later than August 31st following the spring commencement in which the student wishes to participate.

Students wishing to appeal on one of these bases must do so in writing. The appeal must be accompanied by a printout of the student’s degree audit and other appropriate documentation and submitted to the Vice President for Enrollment and Student Development no later than May 1st. Decisions on such appeals will be made within one week of their submittal and are final.

Participation in the Commencement ceremony does not constitute conferral of the degree. Similarly, inclusion of a student’s name on such publications as the Commencement program does not confirm eligibility for the degree.

For more information about, please visit Commencement.


Graduation Rate Information: As part of the Student Right to Know Act, the University is required to publish the graduation rate for students. The rate is based on a cohort of first-time full-time students in a given fall semester (part-time students, transfer, or re-admits are not included as part of the cohort) and is determined on how many of the students in the cohort completed the baccalaureate after six (6) years.

  • For the Fall 1998 Cohort, the graduation rate is 44%
  • For the Fall 1999 Cohort, the graduation rate is 42%
  • For the Fall 2000 Cohort, the graduation rate is 50%
  • For the Fall 2001 Cohort, the graduation rate is 43%
  • For the Fall 2002 Cohort, the graduation rate is 49%
  • For the Fall 2003 Cohort, the graduation rate is 52%
  • For the Fall 2004 Cohort, the graduation rate is 51%
  • For the Fall 2005 Cohort, the graduation rate is 52%
  • For the Fall 2006 Cohort, the graduation rate is 52%
  • For the Fall 2007 Cohort, the graduation rate is 50%
  • For the Fall 2008 Cohort, the graduation rate is 51%
  • For the Fall 2009 Cohort, the graduation rate is 56%
  • For the Fall 2010 Cohort, the graduation rate is 55%
  • For the Fall 2011 Cohort, the graduation rate is 54%
  • For the Fall 2012 Cohort, the graduation rate is 56%
  • For the Fall 2013 Cohort, the graduation rate is 61%
  • For the Fall 2014 Cohort, the graduation rate is 58%
  • For the Fall 2015 Cohort, the graduation rate is ##%


Independent Study:

Independent Study, which is faculty-supervised research or readings into areas of study outside the current curriculum, offers students the opportunity to investigate a research topic or readings independently, under the close supervision of a FSU faculty member. Independent Study will only be approved for research into areas of study that do not duplicate the University's current curriculum of courses. The student will be responsible for meeting the departmental requirements of the Independent Study as outlined in the catalog description and approved by the FSU faculty supervisor and the course department chair. The FSU faculty sponsor will assume responsibility for coordinating the Independent Study, evaluating its results, and determining an appropriate grade. Forms for enrolling in Independent Study are available at the Office of the University Registrar. The completed forms must be submitted to the Office of the University Registrar prior to the end of the Course Add/Drop at the start of the semester. Independent Study topics will be so designated on the student's transcript.


Internship and Practicum:

A number of departments within the University offer students the opportunity to enroll in an internship or practicum for academic credit. Such experiences provide students with the opportunity to undertake a supervised practical experience. An internship may be completed during any academic term. Students interested in an internship for academic credit should consult with their academic advisor and chair of department offering internship, before the semester in which they propose to begin an internship. Students who want to enroll in an internship must meet departmental internship requirements, as specified in the course description, and submit a written application to the faculty member who will supervise their internship and their department chair for approval. This application must include the following information:
• the academic term during which the internship will be undertaken;
• the name of the agency, company, or organization where the internship will be served;
• the internship supervisor, including contact information;
• the work responsibilities of the student intern;
• academic value of the internship experience, including the goal(s) of the internship experience, the total number of hours of the internship, which must meet a minimum of 120 hours for each course-credit, unless a higher minimum is specified in the course description;
• a brief description of how the intern will be evaluated.
This information must be submitted on the departmental internship application form. Registration for an internship must be completed by the end of the Course Add/Drop period for the semester in which the internship will be served. As soon as the University Registrar has received the completed and approved internship application, signed by the faculty supervisor and department chair, the application will be processed and the student enrolled into the course.


Math Placement Re-Testing:

Re-Tests for Math Placement will be given during the semester. Please contact CASA in Peirce Hall for exact dates and times.



Payment of University Charges:

All charges must be paid, or arrangements for payment made with the Student Accounts Office by the indicated due date on the billing statement. Failure to comply will result in removal from classes, as well as from room placement in the residence halls. Vacated places in classes and rooms will then be made available to students on waiting lists. To be enrolled, it will be necessary for the student to re-register for classes through the Course Add/Drop period at the beginning of the semester and to reapply for resident hall living. 


Registration Course Limit:

Students may register for a maximum of four (4) course-credits during the advanced registration period. Additional courses may be added, if available, during the Course Add/Drop Period at the start of the semester. Students may take up to five (5) course-credits only with the written consent of the advisor and the major department chair. This process is intended to assure all students a fair opportunity to secure regular course loads. The minimum academic load for full time attendance per semester is three (3) course-credits.

  • Effective Fall 1996: Withdrawal from a course after the Course Add/Drop Period.
    The new conditions for withdrawing from a course after the Course Add/Drop period apply to courses taken during the Fall 1996 semester and after. Students who withdraw between the third and ninth week (extended beyond the previous eighth week) of a regular semester (or for a quarter course, no later than the fourth full week of the quarter) will incur no academic penalty as far as the grade point average is concerned but will have a notation of "W" on the permanent records (instead of the previous "WP" or "WF"). See the 1997-98 College catalog, page 12, for additional information.
  • Enrolling in a Continuing Education Division Course as part of the Full-Time Academic Load. In the event that students desire to take a course in the Continuing Education Division because one of an equivalent type is not available in the Day Division, they may take the Continuing Education course and count it as part of their full-time academic load. If this is done, the student must pay the full cost of the Continuing Education course in addition to the Day Division program charges.
  • Academic Work through FSU Continuing Education. Effective Summer 1991: Courses toward degree completion taken by Day Division students through FSU Continuing Education, will be posted to the student's Day Division permanent academic record. Course Approval Forms are no longer needed for FSU courses, exemptions are as follows:
    1. Courses deemed academically inappropriate for Day Division programs (by the Department offering the courses) will not be posted to the student's Day Division permanent record.
    2. Students suspended from the Day Division, and are recommended to take Continuing Education Division courses as a non-matriculated student may continue to do so. Such courses will not be posted to the student's Day Division permanent record until the individual has applied and been accepted for readmission to the University.


Required Declaration of Major:

Students are not permitted to register for their junior year without having declared a major. Students may not revert to Undeclared status once junior standing has been attained. An exception is permitted for transfer students admitted to junior standing as Undeclared. Such students may delay declaration of a major for one semester.


Semester Course Load:

The minimum academic load for each semester for full-time undergraduate students is three (3) course credits, which is equivalent to 12 semester hours. The minimum program required for receipt of maximum educational benefit payment under the Veterans Readjustment Benefits Act of 1966 and for receipt of Social Security benefits as a dependent is three (3) course credits per semester.
The average academic load for most fill-time undergraduate students is four (4) course credits, which is equivalent to 16 semester hours. It is recommended for timely degree completion for full-time students to enroll in a minimum of four (4) course credits for each fall and spring semester to graduate with a bachelor’s degree in four (4) years.
Students contemplating a reduced course load should be aware that such a reduction may alter their financial aid and/or veteran’s benefits status as well as extend the time frame needed to complete degree requirements. In planning course loads, students should consider the maximum number of credits allowed each semester, the number of credits required for graduation, the sequence of courses, and the number of semesters they plan to attend the University.
Courses may not be “split,” that is, all classes in a given course must be taken by the student within the same section. A student may not register for two (2) courses that meet at the same time or overlap start/end times.
In the event that students desire to take a course offered through the Department of Continuing Education (CE) because one of an equivalent type is not available in the Day Division, they may request to change their Division Enrollment Status to Evening School (CE) in order to take the CE course. If this is done, students must pay the full cost of the CE course in addition to Day Division program charges.



Senior Citizen Status:

Individuals who are age 60 or older and interested in enrolling in a course or courses at Framingham State University through the Day Division may do so by requesting "Senior Citizen" status. A Senior Citizen may take a course for Audit or for Grade (credit).

You have the opportunity to enroll in courses on a space available basis by completing the Certificate of Tuition Waiver/Senior Citizen Course Enrollment Request form before the start of each semester or during the Course Add/Drop period occurring the first six (6) class days of each semester. Individuals will also need to submit a Proof of Tuition Residency Form when first submitting the Certificate of Tuition Waiver. These completed forms are due in the Office of the  University Registrar prior to the start of the semester.

The Senior Citizen Enrollment Request is a Day Division procedure. Another registration option is to take courses through the Division of Graduate & Continuing Education (McCarthy Center Room 515).


Senior Citizen Course Enrollment Request Form 
This form requires biographical information and the number of courses you are interested in taking. The form must be completed by you and signed by the Registrar (or designee). During the following business day, a Framingham State University ID# will be created for you and listed on the form if you do not have an ID # already. You may request a photocopy of the finalized request form from the Office of the Registrar for the purpose of obtaining a College ID and a Commuter Parking Sticker.

Certificate of Tuition Waiver Form:
This form is to be completed each semester for the purpose of maintaining "Senior Citizen" status (more specifically to receive approval to audit courses in accordance with the Board of Higher Education Tuition Guidelines - A required Audit fee of $130.00 per course). Proof of age is required. A photocopy of a valid driver’s license or a birth certificate is acceptable.

Proof of Residency Form:

This form is for the purpose of determining eligibility for in-state tuition rates.  The Tuition Residency Form must be completed and submitted to the Office of the Registrar before paying for the course(s).  This form no longer requires notarization.

Course Audit form:
If you have not submitted your request for courses prior to the first day of classes, you must complete a Course Audit form during the Course Add/Drop period. The Course Audit form must be filled out by you and signed by the instructor(s) of the course(s) you wish to take. When you are filling out the form, please list your social security number in the box identified as "student ID". In the other boxes provided, clearly print your name (Last, First, Middle Initial), print "NON" as the major, and "Fall" & the year or "Spring" & the year for the semester. On the right half of the form marked "PERMISSION TO AUDIT A COURSE," you will need to print the course number, the course section, and the course title for the course you are intending to add. Note: All courses have a section letter. If you do not include the section letter, the form will not be processed by the Office of the Registrar. On the blank line above the words "PROFESSOR’S SIGNATURE" is the area that the course instructor will need to sign if she or he is allowing you into the course.

Look through the Day Division’s current semester's Master Schedule of Courses along with the Course Change Sheet (pink) for the courses being offered. Although you may think that a course is CLOSED, it is up to the discretion of the instructor as to whether there are seats available in the course. Be advised students are adding and/or dropping courses, which may result in seats becoming available. Again, it is completely up to the instructor of the course whether or not you can Add into a course.

Inside the cover of the Day Division’s Master Schedule of Courses is a list of faculty office locations. A map of the College campus is provided in the back of the booklet. Please note that some of the courses listed in the booklet have several meeting times for an individual section. This means that the course section really meets at all of the times listed but the location may differ.

Completed Course Audit Forms must be submitted to the Office of the Registrar (Dwight Hall 220) before you may be considered as enrolled in the course(s).

Paying Fees for the Course(s) if taking the course(s) for credit (NOT for Audit)
If you are requesting to enroll into a course or courses for "Grade" (credit) or for "Audit" (no credit), you will be required to pay the various fees the College charges per course. First, make sure you have the Senior Citizen Course Enrollment Request form signed by the Registrar (or designee) and the Proof of Residency form completed and submitted to the Office of the Registrar.

Next, you will need to go to the Student Accounts Office located in Dwight Hall, Room 104, to pay the fees for the course(s). They will stamp the blue application form "Paid in Full." (Senior citizens may take a course for Audit at $130.00 per course but must provide photo identification with date of birth to be photocopied.) The Student Accounts Office will retain the Senior Citizen Course Enrollment Request form. You may request a photocopy of the application form, with a College ID# assigned to you, the following business day from the Office of the Registrar.

The Timeline
The above process must take place during the Course Add/Drop period, the first six (6) class days of the semester. For you to be considered enrolled as a "Senior Citizen," all of the paperwork must be received in the Office of the Registrar along with payment submitted to the Student Accounts Office, no later than the last day of the Course Add/Drop period (See Academic Calendar for exact date). THERE ARE NO EXCEPTIONS.

Please note that if you are enrolling in three (3) courses (full-time status) you will be required to provide
Medical/Immunization History to the Office of Health Services and also provide Health Insurance Information.

See University Police (located in the McCarthy Center) for information regarding availability of parking stickers.  Remember to ask for a map that illustrates student-designated parking lots. If you park in an unauthorized space, you will likely be ticketed and/or towed.

Photo ID's may be obtained at the ID Office (McCarthy Center). After you have completed the Senior Citizen Course Enrollment process and have been assigned a Framingham State University student ID#, you will need to request a copy of the Senior Citizen Course Enrollment Request Form to bring with you to the ID Office.



Student Biographical Information:

The University maintains some biographical data on all of it’s students. If there are changes in your biographical data (name, marital status, address (either permanent or local), next of kin, parent's address, etc.), please notify the Office of the University Registrar by completing the Biographical Data Change Form as soon as possible, so University records may be kept up to date.


Transfer Credit Policies:

UNDERGRADUATE TRANSFER CREDIT POLICIES (Prior to Matriculation)
Framingham State University (FSU) determines transferability of credits from other colleges and universities based on best practices as outlined by the American Association of Collegiate Registrars and Admission Officers (AACRAO), the American Council on Education (ACE), the Council for Higher Education Accreditation (CHEA), and the New England Commission on Higher Education (NECHE) Standards on “Integrity in the Award of Academic Credit (4.29 – 4.32)”. Transfer and allocation of credit is determined based on the sending institution’s regional-accreditation, the comparability of the learning experience to FSU, and the applicability of the learning experience to the student’s selected major/minor at FSU.

Stipulations that apply to transfer credit include:

  • College-level courses completed at colleges and universities accredited by the New England Commission on Higher Education (NECHE), or similar regional associations, are acceptable for transfer to FSU.
  • Coursework completed at non-regionally accredited institutions or non-profit companies may be considered on an individual student basis by the major department’s curriculum committee and department chair, through a thorough examination of course content, syllabi, and learning objectives. In the event of a request occurring outside the academic year that must be adjudicated prior to the start of the following fall semester, the department chair, as a member of the department’s curriculum committee, will make the determination. Students may submit an appeal of the denial of transfer credit through the Office of the University Registrar which will then be reviewed by the appropriate Academic Dean, in consultation with the Department Chair.
  • Alternative Sources of Credit:
    • Advanced Placement (AP) exams:
      Advanced Placement (AP) credit towards graduation will be awarded to candidates who obtain scores of three (3) or higher on the College Entrance Examination Board Advanced Placement Tests. Official score results must be forwarded directly to the Office of Undergraduate Admissions. The College Level Examination Program (CLEP) enables students to earn college credit by examination. Credit is awarded for scores of 50 or higher.
    • International Baccalaureate (IB) Higher level exams;
    • Advanced Level (A-Level) exams;
    • Joint Services Transcript (JST) as certified by the American Council on Education (ACE);
    • DSST/DANTES (Defense Activity for Non-Traditional Education Support) exams.

Official score reports are required in order to be considered for transfer credit.

  • International Student Admission
    All official transcripts from secondary schools and colleges must be sent directly to the Office of Undergraduate Admissions. A certified course-by-course evaluation of foreign credentials must be provided by all transfer applicants and any freshman applicants who have taken university-level work outside of the United States at a university. Students may also be eligible for college credit who have completed Arbitur examinations at the secondary school level, International Baccalaureate (IB) courses, General Certificate of Education (GEC) Advance Level (i.e. “A” level courses in some countries), or Advanced Placement (AP). The certified evaluation must be in English and include grade and/or score and recommended credit hour equivalents for each course.  If more than one university or college was attended, official transcripts and certified course-by-course evaluations from each institution must be forwarded to the Office of Undergraduate Admissions by the appropriate deadline.
  • Transferability and allocation of courses to General Education and/or free electives will be determined by the Office of University Registrar, in consultation with academic deans, in accordance with established transfer policies and course articulations. Course to course equivalencies and/or substitutions of transfer credit towards major/minor course requirements must be approved by the department chair in which the major or minor is housed.
  • Transfer credit is awarded for college-level courses only. Developmental coursework does not transfer but may be used for student placement purposes.
  • Transfer credit is given only for courses in which the student received a grade of C- (1.70/4.00 scale) or higher. Note: Exceptions for Spring 2020 coursework will be made where coursework with a passing grade lower than a C- (1.70/4.00) will be accepted in transfer.
  • A Pass/Fail grade is not transferable unless otherwise indicated on the transcript key that the value of Pass is equal to a C- (1.70) or higher. Note: Exceptions will be made for Spring 2020 coursework based on the Transcript Legend/Key from the previous institution.
  • Transfer credits and grades will not affect the Institutional GPA, but will be used in determining “attempted” credits when determining academic standing.
  • Coursework completed at the University prior to matriculation is treated as transfer credit. Transfer credits are not used in the calculation of the grade point average.
  • Students must complete a minimum of 32 course-credits, including courses for general education, major and major-related requirements, as well as open/free electives in order to earn their Framingham State University degree.
  • Once a student is accepted to the University as a degree candidate, all official transcripts are sent to the Office of the University Registrar to be reviewed by the transfer credit evaluator. All approved courses accepted in transfer will be awarded Framingham State University course-credit in an amount equal to the cumulative total number of semester credits transferred divided by four (4) and rounded to the nearest whole number. For example, if a student has five 3-credit courses (15 semester hours) accepted in transfer, four (4) Framingham State University course-credits will be awarded (an equivalent of 16 semester hours).
  • Annually, the Office of the University Registrar will generate a report displaying the transfer of credit, including General Education, and/or equivalencies for review by the UCC and other academic leadership.

UNDERGRADUATE TRANSFER COURSES (After Matriculation)
Off-Campus Course Approval:
  • Transfer credit is awarded for college-level courses only. Developmental coursework does not transfer but may be used for student placement purposes.
  • Transfer credit is given only for courses in which the student received a grade of C- (1.70/4.00 scale) or higher.
  • A Pass/Fail or Credit/No Credit grade is not transferable unless otherwise indicated on the transcript key that the value of Pass or Credit is equal to a C- (1.70) or higher.
  • Effective Fall 2022, coursework taken as an equivalent course from another institution may be used to replace a course previously taken at FSU. The transfer credit will replace the course taken at FSU as a Course Repeat (see Course Repeat Policy for details).
  • Transfer credits and grades will not affect the Institutional GPA, but will be used in determining “attempted” credits when determining academic standing.
  • Off-Campus Course Approval Request forms are available through the Office of the University Registrar or on the web at www.framingham.edu/registrar. Applications for approval of a course must be accompanied by the appropriate catalog description from that institution if the course is not found in R.A.M.S. (Records Articulation Management System). The student must submit the completed form to the Office of the University Registrar prior to taking the course.
  • The Off-Campus Course Approval Request(s) will then be reviewed for course transferability as determined by the University Registrar. All approved courses transferred into Framingham State University after matriculation will be posted to the student’s academic record.
  • Please note: Matriculated undergraduate students may be allowed to transfer up to (3) graduate-level courses taken at Framingham State University or other institutions toward undergraduate degree completion requirements.
  • Transcripts of these approved courses must be submitted to the Office of the University Registrar within six (6) weeks after the completion of the course. It is the student’s responsibility to have official transcripts sent directly by the institution to the Office of the University Registrar.
R.A.M.S. (Records Articulation Management System) for Transfer Course Equivalences at Framingham State University:
  • The University Registrar maintains a list of articulated transfer courses in the Records Articulation Management System (RAMS). Courses displayed in RAMS are those that have previously been established as equivalent courses from other institutions.
  • Students planning to take courses at other institutions should review this list to see if the courses that they plan to take are equivalent to FSU courses. Students can view general information regarding transfer course equivalencies for various institutions for planning purposes only. The information presented here is not a comprehensive list of all institutions and their transfer course equivalencies.
  • Determination of transfer course equivalencies for courses not listed in R.A.M.S. rests with the Academic Department Chairs at FSU. The Academic Department chair of the department in which the course is offered reviews the transfer course equivalencies for a particular course.
  • Students must use Off-Campus Course Approval Request forms to obtain approval for transfer courses prior to enrolling in courses at other institutions.
  • Transferability and allocation of courses to General Education and/or free electives will be determined by the Office of University Registrar, in consultation with academic deans, in accordance with established transfer policies and course articulations.
  • Course to course equivalencies and/or substitutions of transfer credit towards major/minor course requirement must be approved and determined by the department chair in which the major or minor is housed. After obtaining the appropriate signatures for approval of the course, the student must return the completed form to the Office of the University Registrar.
Study Abroad Course Approvals
  • Students approved to enroll in a Study Abroad semester will need to complete Off-Campus Course Requests for courses prior to leaving for the study abroad semester. Please refer to the section regarding Off-Campus Course Requests forms. Note: often times students will enroll in a course or courses that they did not receive prior approval for. For these courses, the student should complete the request form at the start of the semester, else the courses completed may not be eligible to satisfy any major or minor requirements.
  • In order to confirm course enrollment, an enrollment verification form listing the courses for which the student is enrolled will need to be completed by the host institution and sent directly from the host institution to the Office of the University Registrar at FSU. Any coursework listed on the enrollment verification which was not submitted for prior approval will be applied towards open/free elective, or in some cases towards general education requirements.
  • Official transcripts are required to be submitted to the Office of the University Registrar in order for the transfer credit to be finalized. These official transcripts are typically generated by the host institution without the student needing to request this to be done.
GRADUATE TRANSFER CREDIT POLICIES
  • Transfer credit for prior graduate coursework completed at another regionally-accredited college or university will be considered at the time of admission based on course descriptions and documentation submitted with the student’s application.  Matriculated graduate students are expected to complete all coursework at Framingham State University.  Under extenuating circumstances, students may request permission to take a course for transfer credit after admission, and must obtain prior approval in writing from both the program advisor and the Dean of Graduate Studies.  Courses accepted in transfer credit must meet the academic criteria established by Framingham State University.
  • Transfer credit is limited to two (2) graduate courses and must have been completed with a grade of B (3.00 on a 4.00 scale) or better provided they were earned no more than five (5) years prior to the date of admission to Framingham State University.  Exceptions may only be made by the graduate admissions committee. 
  • Transfer credit will be allowed on a course basis. An exception is the program in Counseling Psychology where licensure requirements mandate the acceptance of only four-semester hour courses.  Students wishing to transfer courses valued at less than three-semester hours may do so but in a ratio that guarantees that the equivalent credit hours of the transfer coursework equal or exceed those of Framingham State University courses replaced.  Transfer credit will not be given for life experiences, noncredit, or undergraduate educational experiences.  Professional development courses, even at the graduate level, will not be accepted in transfer toward a master’s degree at the University.

Veterans Information:

VA PENDING PAYMENT COMPLIANCE POLICY
In accordance with Title 38 US Code 3679 subsection (e), Framingham State University has adopted the following additional provisions for any students using U.S. Department of Veterans Affairs (VA) Post 9/11 G.I. Bill® (Ch. 33) or Vocational Rehabilitation and Employment (Ch. 31) benefits, while payment to the institution is pending from the VA. Framingham State University will not:

  • Prevent nor delay the student’s enrollment;
  • Assess a late penalty fee to the student;
  • Require the student to secure alternative or additional funding;
  • Deny the student access to any resources available to other students who have satisfied their tuition and fee bills to the institution, including but not limited to access to classes, libraries, or other institutional facilities.

However, to qualify for this provision, such students may be required to:

  • Produce the Certificate of Eligibility by the first day of class;
  • Provide written request to be certified;
  • Provide additional information needed to properly certify the enrollment as described in other institutional policies.


Categorical Tuition Waiver for Veterans and Active Duty Members
To be eligible for a Categorical Tuition Waiver, a student must:

  • Be a permanent legal resident of Massachusetts for at least one year prior to the opening of the academic year;
  • Be a United States citizen or eligible non-citizen;
  • Be in compliance with applicable Selective Service Registration laws;
  • Not be in default of any federal or state student loan or owe a refund on any previously received financial aid;
  • Present documentation of categorical tuition waiver eligibility to the appropriate to the Office of the University Registrar;
  • Enroll in at least three undergraduate course-credits per semester in a state-supported undergraduate degree or certificate program; and
  • Maintain satisfactory academic progress in accordance with federal and institutional standards.

Be a member of an eligible category as defined below:
Veteran: As provided in M.G.L. Chapter 4, Section 7(43), shall mean:

(1) any person whose last discharge or release was under honorable conditions, and who served for not less than 180 days active service;

or

(2) Any person whose last discharge or release was under honorable conditions and who served in the army, navy, marine corps, coast guard, or air force of the United States, or on full time national guard duty under Titles 10 or 32 of the United States Code or under sections 38, 40 and 41 of chapter 33 for not less than 90 days active service, at least 1 day of which was for wartime service, including: Spanish War, World War I, World War II, Korean, Vietnam, Lebanese peace keeping force, Grenada rescue mission, the Panamanian intervention force, or the Persian Gulf. For purposes of the categorical tuition waivers, “veteran” shall also include any individual who served for not less than ninety days at least one of which was served in theatre for "Operation Restore Hope" and whose last discharge or release was under honorable conditions.
Armed Forces: An active member of the Army, Navy, Marine, Air Force or Coast Guard stationed and residing in Massachusetts.

Unlike the G.I. Bill®, the Categorical Tuition Waiver does not expire. Assistance can continue as long as the student meets the eligibility criteria. Specific definitions of "veteran" in each category can be obtained from the Office of the University Registrar. Those who are eligible must complete and submit a Certificate of Tuition Waiver Form, along with a copy of their separation from service (DD214) and proof of Massachusetts residency, prior to the billing deadline. Certificates must be submitted prior to billing each semester. Veterans whose certificates are not on file prior to receiving bills must pay tuition. A refund will be processed upon receipt and approval of the certificate.

Massachusetts National Guard Tuition Waiver and Federal Tuition Assistance Program
The Massachusetts National Guard Education Assistance Program provides a 100% tuition and fee waiver for active members of the Massachusetts Army National Guard attending a state university or community college program. Assistance can continue as long as you are good academic standing and until you have reached 130 semester hours.
To apply, you must request a Certificate of Eligibility (TAGMA Form 621-3) every 30 credits from the Massachusetts National Guard Education Office by calling that office at 508-968-5889.

VALOR Act and Academic Credit Evaluation Policy
As per the Valor Act of 2012 (Massachusetts), undergraduate admissions applicants may submit their military transcript via the American Council on Education (ACE) for consideration of academic credit in accordance with University's policy with transfer credit. Framingham State will also review for consideration of academic credit the DANTES DSST exams. This information needs to be provided during the application process to the University. Questions regarding the possible transferability of military credits should be directed to the Office of the University Registrar by email (registrarsoffice@framingham.edu) or by phone (508-626-4545).

Veterans Access, Choice, and Accountability Act of 2014
The Veterans Access, Choice, and Accountability Act of 2014 (Public Law 113-146) changed the amount of tuition and fee charges which can be reported to the U.S. Department of Veterans Affairs (VA). Effective July 1, 2015, public institutions of higher education must charge qualifying veterans and dependents tuition and fees at the rate for in-state residents. Any institution not meeting this requirement will be disapproved by VA for the Post-9/11 GI Bill® and Montgomery GI Bill®.
Individuals qualifying for in-state tuition under Public Law 113-146 are:

  • A Veteran receiving benefits under the Montgomery GI Bill® (Chapter 30) or the Post-9/11 GI Bill® (Chapter 33) who lives in the state in which the institution is located (regardless of his/her legal state of residence).
  • A spouse or child using transferred benefits under the Post-9/11 GI Bill® (Chapter 33) who lives in the state in which the institution is located (regardless of his/her legal state of residence).
  • A spouse or child using benefits under the Marine Gunnery Sergeant John David Fry Scholarship who lives in the state in which the institution is located (regardless of his/her legal state of residence).

Isakson and Roe Veterans Health Care and Benefits Improvement Act of 2020 (Public Law 116-315, which modifies 38 U.S.C. 3679(c).
The amendment requires that for all courses, semesters, or terms beginning after August 1, 2021, public institutions of higher education must charge qualifying veterans, dependents, and eligible individuals tuition and fees at the rate for in-state residents.

Section 1010 (Effective:  August 1, 2021). Verification of enrollment to receive Post-9/11 Educational Assistance benefits creates a dual certification for the receipt of Post-9/11 GI Bill® benefits. The school will certify the student’s enrollment after the add-drop date, and then each month thereafter, the student would be required to electronically verify with VA their continued enrollment in that school. If a student fails to certify for two consecutive months, VA will withhold monthly housing allowance payments until the student certifies.

‘‘GI Bill® is a registered trademark of the United States Department of Veterans Affairs (VA). More information about education benefits offered by VA is available at the official United States Government Web site at http://www.benefits.va.gov/gibill."



Voter Registration:

Voter registration forms will be available at the Office of the University Registrar. For students from other states who desire to vote in a state other than Massachusetts, the Federal mail-in affidavit for voter registration or mail-in form supplied by that state may be used. Forms for this purpose are now available in the Office of the University Registrar or the student may contact the appropriate state election official to receive the state form or call or write the Massachusetts Elections Division, Room 1705, McCormack Building, One Ashburton Place, Boston, MA 02108, (617) 7272828 or 1-800462-8683.